Category: Elections (page 2 of 11)

All articles in this category are related to Elections in the Fedora Project. http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Elections

FESCo Election: Interview with Justin Forbes (jforbes)

This is a part of the FESCo Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with Justin Forbes (jforbes)

  • Fedora Account: jforbes
  • IRC: jforbes (found in #fedora-kernel #fedora-devel #fedora-qa #fedora-arm)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page

Questions

Describe some of the important technical issues you foresee affecting the Fedora community. What insight do you bring to these issues?

Fedora is a constantly evolving distribution. Fedora 29 is not just Fedora Core 1, or even Fedora 20 with newer package versions. Big changes happen, and they are typically for the better, but how they are introduced has to be mindful of existing contributors, users, and use cases. Modularity continues to be a major initiative, with a lot of benefits, but also plenty of pitfalls to avoid. We also have the ideas around release cycle, and how Fedora can improve the release process to keep managing things going forward without constant duct tape and string holding it all together. It is often heroic efforts that make a release come together, but that can be improved upon.

What objectives or goals should FESCo focus on to help keep Fedora on the cutting edge of open source development?

There is really a long list of details, but it can be all be summarized with “ensure our processes for introducing new technologies are managed in such a way as to not alienate existing contributors, users, and use cases, while publishing stable releases with useful new features”

This includes things like:
Improving our QA processes
Taking the time improve our release process
Ensuring new changes are ready before wedging them into a release
Making sure changes are not too disruptive to existing workflows.

What are the areas of the distribution and our processes that, in your opinion, need improvement the most? Do you have any ideas how FESCo would be able to help in those “trouble spots”?

I am afraid Rel-eng is going to crack at some point. The load they have taken on is massive. It has come in the form of little things here and there that have mounded up to a difficult workload to manage. FESCo needs to both come up with a way to help make it more manageable (the idea has been floated of extending a release cycle), and ensuring we don’t get back into the situation. QA is hitting similar issues, we keep adding releases. This one is a bit more difficult to “fix”

Modularity continues to be a trouble spot. It is a great feature in theory, adding capabilities to the distro as shipped, but even more so to people who are using or deploying the distro in their own environments. In practice, it has not been managed as well as it could be. There was always some backlash from the community members who just don’t care about modularity, or understand what it brings, but now there is also justified backlash in how things are being currently deployed. FESCo can help to ensure that further features around modularity are planned and executed, though there are a few fires to be put out first.

FESCo Election: Interview with Miro Hrončok (churchyard)

This is a part of the FESCo Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with Miro Hrončok (churchyard)

  • Fedora Account: churchyard
  • IRC: mhroncok (found in #fedora-devel, #fedora-python, #fedora-ambassadors, #fedora-3dprinting)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page

Questions

Describe some of the important technical issues you foresee affecting the Fedora community. What insight do you bring to these issues?

One of the most important issues is that we tend to push technically fresh (and often unfinished) solutions we are so passionate about so fast to our contributors that we sometimes forget not only about the developer experience of contributing to Fedora, but also about the user experience of using it.

Most noticeable thing I see in this area is modularity: We rarely talk about anything different and while it is an excellent idea based on very innovative principles, we forget to make sure not to break the distro. We are creating technical debt and enlarging the technological gap between contributors who’ve decided to go with modularity and those who haven’t yet (and we should strive not to turn that yet to ever).

Another thing many have talked about is the Fedora CI. The idea to run integration tests on Pull Requests and Fedora updates is awesome. This may render contributions to Fedora easier than ever. Yet we somehow decided that starting with a complex, one size fits all universal standard test interface that does everything just to write and run those tests is more important than having a trivial way to do this. I’d prefer starting with a minimal viable product before adding so many layers of complexity.

The things in Fedora Engineering are moving forward at great speed towards progress. However, I think we should regularly take a moment to slow down and look back. How are the changes we made affecting the life of an average Fedora packager? Tester? Translator? How does this affect our packaging standards? Is there a buy-in from the community, or is just for the ones involved? What happens if…?

What objectives or goals should FESCo focus on to help keep Fedora on the cutting edge of open source development?

I see two main concerns in this question:

First, to keep Fedora on the cutting edge of open source development for Fedora contributors, we must make sure that they can contribute to Fedora as easily as possible. They shouldn’t be blocked on unresponsive maintainers, they shouldn’t be blocked on FTBFS packages they don’t maintain, they shouldn’t be blocked by half of the distro moving to modules without the necessary tooling. As FESCo, we can hardly go and fix all the ignored packages and FTBFSes, but we can decide to make the policies easier for individual contributors. We should make Fedora a more collaborative environment, where one person being on a vacation from Fedora for a year (or forever) cannot block the work of dozens of others. Pull Requests are ideal for this and we might design a procedure for ignored requests other than the tedious nonresponsive maintainer policy. Packages (components generally) are still pretty much owned by individuals. Most of them are awesome and open to collaboration, yet some of them are unfortunately acting like passive blockers or active dictators. We should make sure that nothing in Fedora is private property, but rather implement a collaborative workflow and environment.

Secondly, to keep Fedora on the cutting edge of open source development for people using Fedora as their platform of choice, we must hear from them and/or model their use cases. When considering a change (or the status quo) in Fedora, we should ask how it impacts a Rust developer, a web designer, a Lua hacker, a Linux kernel engineer, a JavaScript student, a Python data analyst, a hardware specialist, a QA engineer, or any other kind of developer. For example, what happens if we deliberately delay a Fedora release for half a year? Will those people get the cutting edge tools they need? Will we provide the tools for them via regular updates or in some other way? How do we achieve it without putting half the distro into a module or telling everyone to use rawhide…? We should figure such things out before making a tough decision.

What are the areas of the distribution and our processes that, in your opinion, need improvement the most? Do you have any ideas how FESCo would be able to help in those “trouble spots”?

As for the distribution, it’s the modularity/non-modularity gap. For our processes, I believe we need to streamline the policy for nonrepsonsive maintainers and propose creating a framework for dealing with actively blocking maintainers. FESCo should assess new Fedora changes not only on the basis of how they are making Fedora superior, but also on how do they affect current Fedora contributors and whether the tooling for them is ready (or at least included as part of the Fedora change). FESCo should also design new policies and procedures to make sure individual contribution is always easy and encouraging, instead of difficult and sometimes even disheartening. This will involve not only technical challenges but also procedural changes.

FESCo Election: Interview with Jeremy Cline (jcline)

This is a part of the FESCo Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with Jeremy Cline (jcline)

  • Fedora Account: jcline
  • IRC: jcline (found in fedora-devel, #fedora-kernel, #fedora-apps, #fedora-admin)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Council Election: Interview with Alejandro Perez (aeperezt)

This is a part of the Council Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with Alejandro Perez (aeperezt)

  • Fedora Account: aeperezt
  • IRC: aeperezt (found in #fedora-ambassdors #fedora-latam #fedora-pa #fedora)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Council Election: Interview with John M. Harris, Jr. (JohnMH)

This is a part of the Council Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with John M. Harris, Jr. (JohnMH)

  • Fedora Account: JohnMH
  • IRC: JohnMH (found in #fedora-commops, #fedora-games, #fedora-kde, #fedora-3dprinting, #fedora-security, #fedora-devel, #openblox)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Council Election: Interview with Dennis Gilmore (ausil)

This is a part of the Council Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with Dennis Gilmore (ausil)

  • Fedora Account: ausil
  • IRC: dgilmore (found in #proyecto-fedora #fedora-s390x #fedora-qa #fedora-ppc #fedora-noc #fedora-mips #fedora-meeting-3 #fedora-meeting-2 #fedora-meeting-1 #fedora-meeting #fedora-latam #fedora-kernel #fedora-iot #fedora-devel #fedora-council #fedora-ci #fedora-br #fedora-arm #fedora-apps #fedora-ambassadors #fedora-admin #fedora-3dprinting #epel #centos-devel #atomic)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Council Election: Interview with Eduard Lucena (x3mboy)

This is a part of the Council Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, December 6th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

Interview with Eduard Alexander Lucena Mendoza (x3mboy)

  • Fedora Account: x3mboy
  • IRC: x3mboy (found in #fedora-mktg #fedora-latam #fedora-commops #fedora-mindshare)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Elections nominations now open

Today we are starting the Nomination & Campaign period during which we accept nominations to the “steering bodies” of the following teams:

This period is open until 2018-Nov-28 at 23:59:59 UTC.

Candidates may self-nominate. If you nominate someone else, please check with them to ensure that they are willing to be nominated before submitting their name.

Nominees can start preparing their answers for questions in the Election Questionnaire. The questions can be found in the template files on Pagure.

Nominees submit their questionnaire answers via a private Pagure issue.  The Election Wrangler or their backup will publish the interviews to the Community Blog a day before the start of the Voting period (2018-Dec-06).

Please note that the interview is mandatory for all nominees. Nominees not having their interview ready by end of the Interview period (2018-Dec-05) will be disqualified and removed from the election. Nominees may submit their interview answers immediately and may edit them until the end of the interview period.

Nominees are encouraged to begin their interview answers as soon as they accept their nomination.

As part of the Campaign people might also ask questions to specific
candidates on the devel mailing list, if they want.

The full schedule of the December 2018 Elections is available on the
Elections schedule.

2018 May Elections to FESCo: Interviews

Fedora Elections - All interviews published

Fedora FESCo Elections are here and it’s time to vote! All candidate interviews to FESCo are published.

The 2018 May cycle of Elections is in full swing. Voting officially began on Thursday, June  7th, and ends on Wednesday, June 13th at 23:59 UTC. Voting takes place on the Voting application website. As part of the Elections coverage on the Community Blog, the candidates running for seats published their interviews and established their platforms here. Are you getting ready to vote and looking for this information? You can find the full list of candidates and links to their interviews below.

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FESCo Election: Interview with Till Maas (till)

This is a part of the FESCo Elections Interviews series. Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The voting period starts on Thursday, June 7th and closes promptly at 23:59:59 UTC on Wednesday, June 13th, 2018.

Interview with Till Maas (till)

  • Fedora Account: till
  • IRC: tyll (found in #fedora-releng #fedora #fedora-devel #fedora-admin #fedora-apps #fedora-social #fedora-de #epel)
  • Fedora User Wiki Page

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