Tag: Google Summer of Code (GSoC) (page 1 of 4)

GSOC Progress Report for Linux System Roles

Student: Elvira García Ruiz

  • Fedora Account: egruiz
  • IRC: elvira (#fedora-summer-coding, #systemroles)

Summary

June was my first month as a GSOC student, and I must say is has been a tough but fun ride! I’ve been working at improving the Linux System Roles Network Role. My main focus for this summer is being able to improve the testing systems. In order to achieve that, I will introduce Pytest as a tool for the integration tests.

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GSoC Progress Report: Dashboard for Packit

About Me

Hi, I am Anchit, a 19 y.o. from Chandigarh, India. I love programming, self-hosting, gaming, reading comic books, and watching comic-book based movies/tv.

The first version of Fedora I tried was 21 when I came across it during my distro-hopping spree. I used it for a couple of months and then moved on to other distros. I came back to Fedora in 2017 after a couple of people on Telegram recommended it and have been using it ever since. A big reason why I stuck with Fedora this time is the community. Shout out to @fedora on Telegram. They’re nice, wholesome and helpful. They also got me into self-hosting and basic sys-admin stuff.

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Call for Projects and Mentors – GSoC 2020

Fedora at Google Summer of Code 2020

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development.
Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.  In the previous year, Fedora had an awesome participation
and we would like to continue to be mentoring Org this year too.

Fedora needs your help!

Fedora is currently looking for mentors and projects, it’s very staright forward to propose yourself as a mentor and a project.
The project encourages mentors to come forward and propose project ideas by 2020-02-10. More details are given below.

How to Propose a Project?

If you want to mentor a specific project, think carefully about several things:

  • Do you have enough time to work on this with the student during the entire project.
    You will be helping someone else when they get stuck. You don’t want to become a blocker because you’re busy.
  • It is harder to find success when you are completely certain of how an idea needs to be implemented; finding a student with the skills and interest to implement a specific solution is a lot harder than finding a student with enough skills to respond to a use case need. Also, students learn more when they help design and guide the project. In other words, provide guidance and direction but let the student do some of the “driving.”
  • Where you can have looser ideas, you may be able to find a student who works as a sort-of intern who can implement a solution to a use case you have. In past experiences, students going after a use case are more likely to get somewhere with self-direction and support from you.
  • Who can help you?

Try to find a second mentor for the project.

If you’re interested in working with a student on a specific project you should post your idea to the Mentored Projects Issue Tracker. Your issue should be tagged GSoC and use the Google Summer of Code template. We strongly encourage you to find a second person to help with mentoring and to solicit feedback on your proposal

Can I be a Mentor Without a Project?

Yes! You can either:

Work with a student who brings an idea to your sub-project. This requires a different level of communication throughout the project, but can be the most rewarding.

Be a general mentor. This is a person who works with all students regardless of their project. To become a general mentor please open an issue in the Mentored Projects Issue Tracker offering your help. Please tag the issue with the GSoC tag.

GSoC summer 2019: Fedora Gooey Karma

This blog post is to summarise my journey for Google Summer of Code (GSoC) with the Fedora community, The journey started the day I mailed my mentor about the project, and it was a hell of a ride for sure. Let’s get started.

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Fedora Gooey Karma Week 2 report GSoC

  • Fedora Account: imzubin
  • IRC: iamzubin || iamzubin_ (found in #fedora-summer-coding, #fedora-devel, #fedora-qa )
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Niharika and Divyansh: Improving modular packages and container security

This post is the fourth and final introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Niharika Shrivastava and Divyansh Kamboj, who are working on projects to improve Fedora module package metadata and add additional security hardening to containers, respectively.

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Shaily and Zubin: Building CI pipelines and helping testers

This post is the third introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Shaily Sangwan and Zubin Choudhary, who are both working on projects to improve quality assurance processes in the Fedora community.

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Alisha and Shraddha: Positive feedback loops in Fedora

This post is the second introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Alisha Mohanty and Shraddha Agrawal, who are both working on Fedora Happiness Packets to promote positive feedback loops in the Fedora community.

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Manas and Marek: Improving Fedora release process

This post is the first introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Manas Mangaonkar and Marek Marusin, who are both working on projects that automate planning and execution of Fedora releases.

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GSOC 2019 – release-bot project

On May 6, the selected students for Google summer of code 2019 were officially announced. We, as mentors of the release-bot project, would like to thank all applicants and provide insight into our decision process.

Google summer of code is popular for the past several years which means that competition is really high. For our project, release-bot, this was definitely the case. We had several very promising candidates providing early contributions. The code which was written during the application period resulted in the new release `0.7.0` of release bot, thank you to (in alphabetical order) @Aniket-Pradhan, @Elias999, @marusinm, @shresthagrawal, @Toaster192, and @Z0Marlin

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