Category: Fedora Project Community (page 1 of 18)

All articles in this category are relevant to ALL teams and subgroups across the entire Fedora Project community.

Fedora Join SIG 2019 retrospective

SIG members

There are five active members animating the SIG. One new contributor asked to join the SIG in 2019. And other people not formally part of the SIG but that welcome new people and hang around in the Telegram group, proposing new ideas and giving feedback on various topics.

We get in touch with new people practically every day.

The majority of newcomers get in touch via Telegram, someone via IRC and the fewer in the mailing list.

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Come Socialize at the Fedora Social Hour!

COVID-19 is getting pretty real, with social distancing, shelter-in-place, and lockdown orders in effect in areas around the world. Some of us are perhaps getting sick of the company we are stuck with, and others of us are feeling pretty isolated without any company at all.

Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller and contributor Neal Gompa had the idea for a Fedora Social Hour where folks could video chat in and get a little (virtual) human contact and conversation.

Sound like a welcome break from isolation to you? Check out the details below!

Fedora Social Hour

Thursday, April 2nd at 11 PM UTC

( Convert to your timezone )

How to join:

We will be hosting this social meetup on matrix.org! No need to download a client, although you’ll need to sign up for an account to participate if you do not already have one. You can view the chat before signing up to see if you want to participate. Here is the URL:

https://riot.im/app/#/room/#fedora-social-hour:matrix.org

Last week we did a trial run using Mozilla Hubs. It’s a fun little VR-based chat system with some interesting quirks! One of the requests we had was if there could be some kind of music playing in the background. It looks like Riot.im has a built-in Spotify integration, as well as Jitsi and Etherpad integration. So we’ll be playing around with and testing these goodies out!

A little preview of how the Riot.im room will look, with Jitsi video chat in the upper right, an etherpad in the upper left, and the main chat below (anonymized here for privacy)

Do know that Riot.im is an open source client for matrix.org, which is an open source chat protocol (kind of like a next-gen IRC.) If you would prefer to join up with us using IRC, though, here’s how you can do that:

See you there!

On being part of the Fedora community

Hi, everyone. As I am sure you know, I often say that the “Friends” value of the Fedora Foundations is the one that’s personally most important to me. I want to remind everyone that when you are a Fedora contributor — a developer, a writer, an advocate, or any other role in our community — it’s important to keep the spirit of “be excellent to each other” in mind.

Our Code of Conduct says: members of the Fedora community should be respectful when dealing with other contributors as well as with people outside the Fedora community and with users of Fedora. Please be extra-aware of how your actions even outside of our mailing lists, forums, and channels reflect upon Fedora as a whole.

We just adopted a new vision statement: The Fedora Project envisions a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities.  We are continually working to make Fedora an inclusive place where all are welcome. I wish it did not need to be said, but here it is: personal attacks, innuendo, and inciting language are examples of things that do not create a welcoming community, and will not be tolerated in Fedora. We understand that even friends can disagree at times, and that emotions can lead to escalation. The Code of Conduct ticket queue is a safe place where folks can open up an issue to resolve difficult situations. Please make use of it if you ever feel it is warranted.

As I mentioned on the magazine, these are uncertain times in the face of Covid-19. It is more important than ever that we care for and treat each other well, as we are on the internet working virtually more than ever. On a final note- I am sending more well wishes for the health and safety of our Fedora family. Remember to be excellent to each other. Thanks!

— Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader

Call for Projects and Mentors – GSoC 2020

Fedora at Google Summer of Code 2020

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development.
Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.  In the previous year, Fedora had an awesome participation
and we would like to continue to be mentoring Org this year too.

Fedora needs your help!

Fedora is currently looking for mentors and projects, it’s very staright forward to propose yourself as a mentor and a project.
The project encourages mentors to come forward and propose project ideas by 2020-02-10. More details are given below.

How to Propose a Project?

If you want to mentor a specific project, think carefully about several things:

  • Do you have enough time to work on this with the student during the entire project.
    You will be helping someone else when they get stuck. You don’t want to become a blocker because you’re busy.
  • It is harder to find success when you are completely certain of how an idea needs to be implemented; finding a student with the skills and interest to implement a specific solution is a lot harder than finding a student with enough skills to respond to a use case need. Also, students learn more when they help design and guide the project. In other words, provide guidance and direction but let the student do some of the “driving.”
  • Where you can have looser ideas, you may be able to find a student who works as a sort-of intern who can implement a solution to a use case you have. In past experiences, students going after a use case are more likely to get somewhere with self-direction and support from you.
  • Who can help you?

Try to find a second mentor for the project.

If you’re interested in working with a student on a specific project you should post your idea to the Mentored Projects Issue Tracker. Your issue should be tagged GSoC and use the Google Summer of Code template. We strongly encourage you to find a second person to help with mentoring and to solicit feedback on your proposal

Can I be a Mentor Without a Project?

Yes! You can either:

Work with a student who brings an idea to your sub-project. This requires a different level of communication throughout the project, but can be the most rewarding.

Be a general mentor. This is a person who works with all students regardless of their project. To become a general mentor please open an issue in the Mentored Projects Issue Tracker offering your help. Please tag the issue with the GSoC tag.

Fedora status updates: November 2019

Welcome to the monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the weekly updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

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Where are the team’s newcomers?

I was wondering why, in the QA team, there are various newcomers willing to contribute, but so little interaction in the mailing list.

If a person would like to join the QA team, like many other Fedora teams, one of the first things they are supposed to do (at least as a good practice, if not as prescribed by the team SOP) is to send an introductory email to the team’s mailing list. 

And it is simple to spot that—after the introduction email and eventually being sponsored into the FAS group—in most cases the newcomers don’t send any other mail in the following times. Why?

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Extending the Minimization objective

Earlier this summer, the Fedora Council approved the first phase of the Minimization objective. Minimization looks at package dependencies and tries to minimize the footprint for a variety of use cases. The first phase resulted in the development of a feedback pipeline, a better understanding of the problem space, and some initial ideas for policy improvements.

Phase two is now submitted to the Council for approval. In this phase, the team will select specific use cases to target and work to develop a minimized set of packages for them. You can read the updated objective in pull request #64. Please provide feedback there or on the council-discuss mailing list. The Council will vote on this in two weeks.

October 2019: Fedora status updates

Welcome to the monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the weekly updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

Mindshare committee

So far this year, the Mindshare committee has approved all 12 event requests that have been filed. Three requests for swag-only have been approved. The community is reminded that Mindshare is there to help fund events and they can only do that if they’re asked.

On a related note, Sumantro Mukherjee published a Community Blog post calling for Fedora 31 release parties. Fedora 31 is scheduled for release later this month, so now is a good time to start planning release parties.

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) and Outreachy were completed successfully. The Mindshare committee is working on combining GSoC, Outreachy, and Google Code-In efforts under a single “mentored projects” umbrella.

Minimization objective

In the past month, the Minimization team brought the “feedback pipeline” to life. Feedback Pipeline gives a quick overview of the use cases we’re targeting to minimize. It shows required packages, their dependencies, the overall size, and allows a deeper inspection with interactive dependency graphs. As part of that work, the team is working on identifying use cases to target.

The Council approved the Minimization objective on a short-term basis. Adam Šamalík will be submitting a proposal for the next phase of this objective to the Council soon.

Fedora Silverblue

The Silverblue team is working on Fedora Flatpak preinstallation. Some patches are pending into the Fedora infrastructure to help enable this. The goal is to have the same preinstalled applications as Fedora Workstation.

In addition, planning for Fedora 32 Silverblue is underway. The team has a Kanban board available to the community.

Fedora Join is trying a new people focused workflow for newcomers

When a newcomer, let’s call her “Jen”, comes to Fedora and looks for where to begin, the general workflow she is introduced to is quite task-oriented. “Find something to do, get started, learn along the way, ask if you have a question” we say. We have easyfix and What Can I do for Fedora (wcidff) designed to quickly help Jen find something to do, for example. The idea, of course, is that Jen will familiarise herself with the tools, the processes, and the people while she works on this task. This works sometimes. Sometimes it doesn’t. It depends on what Jen has picked to do. Sometimes the learning curve is too steep—there are too many tools and processes to learn. Sometimes Jen works on her task in isolation and is too scared to ask questions they think are “silly”. Sometimes Jen just gets too busy to keep working on it.

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Searching simple or complex strings in text files using grep with regular expression

As a Linux programmer or system admin, it is common to search through text for a given sequence of characters (such as a word or phrase), called a string, or even for a pattern describing a set of such strings; this article contains few hands-on examples for doing these types of tasks. In this article, we first review how grep Linux works while reviewing few basic string searches. It follows by diving into more complex string search using grep with regular expression.

Searching for a Word or Phrase with Grep Command

The primary command used for searching through text is a tool called grep. It outputs lines of its input that contain a given string or pattern.

To search for a word, give that word as the first argument. By default, grep searches standard input; give the name of a file to search as the second argument.

To output lines in the file ‘catalog’ containing the word ‘boy’, type:

$ grep boy catalog

To search for a phrase, specify it in quotes.

To output lines in the file ‘book’ containing the word ‘Java Coding’, type:

$ grep ’Java Coding’ book

The preceding example outputs all lines in the file ‘book’ that contain the exact string ‘Java Coding’; it will not match, however, lines containing ‘java coding’ or any other variation on the case of letters in the search pattern. Use the ‘-i’ option to specify that matches are to be made regardless of case.

 To output lines in the file ‘book’ containing the string ‘java coding’ regardless of the case of its letters, type:

$ grep -i ’java coding’ book

This command outputs lines in the file ‘book’ containing any variation of the pattern ‘java coding’, including ‘java coding’, ‘JAVA CODING’, and ‘jaVA coDIng’.

One thing to remember is that grep only matches patterns that appear on a single line, so in the preceding example, if one line in ‘book’ ends with the word ‘java’ and the next begins with ‘coding’, grep will not match either line.

You can specify more than one file to search. When you specify multiple files, each match that grep

outputs is preceded by the name of the file it is in (and you can suppress this with the ‘-h’ option.). A good knowledge of Linux filesystem would be helpful to navigate the right file and folder directories.

To output lines in all of the files in the current directory containing the word ‘JAVA’, type:

$ grep JAVA *

 To output lines in all of the ‘.txt’ files in the ‘˜/doc’ directory containing the word ‘Java’, suppressing the listing of file names in the output, type:

$ grep -h Java ˜/doc/*.txt

Use the ‘-r’ option to search a given directory recursively, searching all subdirectories it contains.

 To output lines containing the word ‘Java’ in all of the ‘.txt’ files in the ‘˜/doc’ directory and in all of its subdirectories, type:

$ grep -r Java ˜/doc/*.txt

Grep Command with Regular Expressions

In addition to word and phrase searches, you can use grep to search for complex text patterns called regular expressions. A regular expression—or “regexp”—is a text string of special characters that specifies a set of patterns to match.

Technically speaking, the word or phrase patterns described in the previous section are regular expressions—just very simple ones. In a regular expression, most characters—including letters and numbers—represent themselves. For example, the regexp pattern 1 matches the string ‘1’, and the pattern boy matches the string ‘boy’.

There are a number of reserved characters called metacharacters that do not represent themselves in a regular expression, but they have a special meaning that is used to build complex patterns. These metacharacters are as follows: ., *, [, ], ˆ, $, and \. It is good to note that such metacharacters are common among almost all of common and special Linux distributions. Here is a good article that covers special meanings of the metacharacters and gives examples of their usage.

 To specify one of these literal characters in a regular expression, precede the character with a ‘\’.

 To output lines in the file ‘book’ that contain a ‘$’ character, type:

$ grep ’\$’ book

 To output lines in the file ‘book’ that contains the string ‘$14.99’, type:

$ grep ’\$14\.99’ book

 To output lines in the file ‘book’ that contain a ‘\’ character, type:

$ grep ’\\’ book

Summary

In this article, we reviewed how to search string in a text file in the Linux using grep command. We also discussed how to combine the power of regular expressions with grep to run complex string searches.

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