Category: Fedora Project Community (page 1 of 7)

All articles in this category are relevant to ALL teams and subgroups across the entire Fedora Project community.

Fedora was at PyCon SK 2017

At the second weekend in March 2017, Fedora had a booth at PyCon SK, a community-organized conference for the Python programming language held in Bratislava, Slovakia. The event happened for the second time this year, and it happened with Fedora again.

PyCon SK 2017 took 3 days. First day most of the talks were in Slovak (or Czech) and Michal Cyprian presented problems that my arise when users use sudo pip and how we want to solve those problems in Fedora by making sudo pip safe again. During the lightnings talks section, I presented about Elsa, a tool that helps to create static web pages using Flask. Elsa powers up the Fedora Loves Python website.

Michal Cyprian presenting

Michal Cyprian presenting. Photo by Ondrej Dráb, CC BY-SA

The next day was mostly English. Another Fedora contributors Jona Azizaj and Petr Viktorin had their talks. Jona presented about building Python communities and empowering women. Petr’s talk was about the balance of Python (constraints and conventions versus the freedom to do whatever you want) and its impact on the language and the community. Petr also metacoached the Django Girls workshop on Sunday.

But Fedora’s presence was not just through people. Fedora had a booth filled with swag. We gave out all our remaining Fedora Loves Python stickers, plenty of Fedora 25 DVDs, pins, stickers, pens, buttons… We had couple of Proud Fedora User t-shirts available and plenty of Fedora users asked for them, so we decided to come up with a quiz about Fedora and a raffle to decide who gets them.

Fedora Swag

Fedora Swag

Fedora booth at PyCon SK 2017

Fedora booth at PyCon SK 2017. Photo by Ondrej Dráb, CC BY-SA

Lot of the visitors were already familiar with Fedora or even Fedora users this year, which was quite different in compassion with the previous year, where a lot of people were actually asking what Fedora is. <joke>Maybe because we already explained it a year ago, now every visitor already uses Fedora?</joke>

See you next year Bratislava!

Featured Image Photo by Ondrej Dráb, CC BY-SA

Test Days: Internationalization (i18n) features of Fedora 26

All this week, we will be testing for  i18n features in Fedora 26. Those are as follows:

  • Fontconfig Cache – The fontconfig cache files are placed onto /var/cache/fontconfig now. this seems incompatible with the ostree model. so this is a proposal to move it to /usr/lib/fontconfig/cache.
  • Libpinyin 2.0 Now libpinyin provides 1-3 sentence candidates instead of one sentence candidate, which will greatly improve the guessed sentence correction rate.
There has been further improvements in features introduced in previous versions of Fedora those are as follows:
  • Emoji typing – In the computing world, it’s rare to have person not know about emoji. Before, it was difficult to type  emoji in Fedora. Now, we have an emoji typing feature in Fedora 26.
  • Unicode 9.0 – With each release, Unicode introduces new characters and scripts to its encoding standard. We have a good number of additions in Unicode 9.0. Important libraries are updated to get the new additions into Fedora.
  • IBus typing booster Multilingual support – IBus typing booster started providing multilingual support (typing more than one language using single IME – no need to switch).

Other than this, we also need to make sure all other languages works well specifically input, output, storage and printing.

How to participate

Most of the information is available on the Test Day wiki page. In case of doubts, feel free to send an email to the testing team mailing list.

Though it is a test day, we normally keep it on for the whole week. If you don’t have time tomorrow, feel free to complete it in the coming few days and upload your test results.

Let’s test and make sure this works well for our users!

Fedora Google Summer of Code Students for 2017

On Thursday, May 4th, the official announcement of accepted projects for this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC) was released.  Fedora is proud to be one of the selected participating organizations and we’re pleased to announce who will spend the summer hacking on Fedora-related projects!

What is Google Summer of Code?

In case you’ve never heard of the program, you can head to the GSoC homepage. The sub-title on the page sums it up perfectly:

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development. Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.

That basically means Google, together with FLOSS organizations, selects many talented students. These students are offered the oportunity to have an internship with the FLOSS organization.  The students are paid a stipend by Google to allow them to keep their summer free for the internship.

Google started the program in 2005 and Fedora has been participating since 2006. That means this is the eleventh year Fedora has taken part! Last year, a total of 1,206 students were accepted, 10 of whom were with Fedora.

What projects were accepted?

This year, a total of 1317 students have been accepted and six of them will be working on different Fedora or Fedora-related projects. The areas of those projects can’t be summed up easily so we’re linking to their proposal pages directly (for those who didn’t forget to put it on the wiki). If you’re not in the mood to read them at this point, worry not, a follow-up post will contain a short gist of their proposals.

Now without further a do, here is a list of the 6 students!

What happens next?

Now is the time for community bonding which means the students will now set up their Fedora accounts, start hanging around on the IRC channels, mailing lists and get the overall feel of the Fedora community, while also setting up their blogs to write about their progress during the summer.  This is also the time for you to make friends with them and welcome them to our community.

It is also the time to start setting up their development environment and they can even start sending small patches to their respective projects.

However, the actual coding part (that is, hacking away on what’s included in the proposal) will start on 30th of May and ends on 21st of August.

In a follow-up post, we’ll bring you the links to their blogs, along with the students’ introductions.

Fedora Council FAD Report – 2017/2018 Initial Steps

The Fedora Council met for an in-person FAD for three days from 26-28 March in Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA. Almost the entire Council was able to attend. Josh Boyer, Brian Exelbierd, Robert Mayr, Matthew Miller, and Langdon White, were present, and unfortunately, Jan Kuřik and María Leandro could not make it. We chose Grand Rapids to accommodate one of the two members with travel challenges and to reduce overall travel costs for the rest of us.

We set a full agenda and managed to discuss the topics over the three full days.

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Fedora goes front-end in Minsk, Belarus

Presenting PatternFly in Minsk, Belarus, equipped with a Fedora t-shirt and a Red Hat

Presenting PatternFly in Minsk, Belarus, equipped with a Fedora t-shirt and a Red Hat

A casual slip in conversation that I would be attending a conference spiraled into a Fedora community booth and a PatternFly speech related mission. As a result, I went to Rolling Scopes to find out what these developer types thought about Fedora and also to present PatternFly. PatternFly is an open source project with a community of designers and developers collaborating to build a UI framework for enterprise web applications.

The most common question we received from attendees: what was I doing here? A good question too. Well, what was I doing there? I was on a fact-finding mission. What are front-end developers doing in order to carry out their work? What desktop are they using, what servers are they using? Would they be willing to use Fedora?

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IRC classroom instructors wanted

We’ve been working to restart the classroom sessions that we hosted regularly until a few years ago. We had a few discussions at the Fedora Join SIG meeting recently and realized that there’s so much that can be done. Among the ideas were using video communication platforms, setting up a moodle instance, and linking up with the campus programmes. Setting up a complete classroom programme requires a lot more homework before we can come up with a system and put the infrastructure in place. So, while this is being worked on, we thought it may be a good idea to resurrect the classic IRC classroom sessions to get the ball rolling in the meantime.

Instructors needed for classroom sessions

Before we can announce the classroom sessions, we want to line a few up. This is where we need help – we’re looking for instructors that want to take up these sessions. The sessions can be about anything – tools (Vim, Git, Emacs, Inkscape, Gimp, etc.), workflows (using updates-testing to help QA, contributing to the Magazine or Community Blog, etc.), development (Flask, kernel hacking, debugging, etc.)  or even educational sessions such as the free software philosophy. Really, anything at all.

If you’d like to take up an IRC classroom session, please get in touch with us on the classroom mailing list.  We’re also looking for recruitersemcees and anything else you want to help with!

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017: Mentors and ideas needed!

The Fedora Project has participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) as a mentoring organization for over a decade now. GSoC is a summer program aiming to bring more student developers into open source software development. It enables students to spend their summer break working with open source organizations on projects proposed by particpation organizations and supported by mentors. Once again, Fedora is participating again this year and is looking for project ideas.

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Fedora speakers at FOSDEM 2017

Excited for FOSDEM 2017? FOSDEM, or the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting, is held every year in late January or early February. This year, FOSDEM is taking place on February 4th and 5th. At this year’s conference, an estimated 8,000 or more attendees are expected. As one of the largest open source conferences in Europe, there are many Fedora Project developers and representatives attending the event. In addition to our community stand, you will find 24 speakers from the community giving talks over the weekend. This post gives a quick way for you to find out who is speaking and where to find them in FOSDEM!

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Elections Retrospective, January 2017

The results are in! The Fedora Elections for the Fedora 25 release cycle of FESCo, FAmSCo and the Council concluded on Tuesday, January 17th. The results are posted on the Fedora Voting Application and announced on the mailing lists. You can also find the full list of winning candidates below. I would also like to share some interesting statistics in this January 2017 Elections Retrospective.

January 2017 Elections Retrospective Report

In this election cycle, the voter turnout is above its average level. It is great news as it shows increased interest of the Fedora people in community affairs.

This election cycle was hit by some planning issues as we were running the Elections over Christmas 2016 period. At the beginning I was worrying about the turnout due to the Christmas, but fortunately this was odd and we are more than good from this point of view.

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Flock 2017 bids are now being accepted (due 28 Feb 2017)

It is time to start the bid process for this year’s Flock.  This year we are back in North America for Flock 2017. If you’d like to help host the event in your city, it’s time to start putting together a bid.  To find out what you need to do, read the wiki page. Bids are due by February 28, 2017, so do not wait to start.  It takes more time than you may realize to compile all the required information for a good bid.

Tips and advice for Flock 2017 planning

Keep in mind that committing to help plan a conference is a lot of work and shouldn’t be approached lightly. It’s a big time commitment, and as the local contact, you’re critical to the success of the event. Flock has been held successfully on college campuses and in hotels.  We need to make sure that the space will work for both the conference and be affordable.  Details are on the wiki page.

Not sure where to begin? You can view some of the previous winning bids for past years as a reference point for building your own bid. Check out some of these for examples:

Feel free to let me know if you have any other questions or need help getting your bid together.  If you’re not already subscribed to the flock-planning email list, you should also do so.

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