Category: Infrastructure (page 1 of 3)

All articles in this category are related to the Infrastructure team in the Fedora Project. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Infrastructure

Application service categories and community handoff

The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team recently wrote about our face-to-face meeting where we developed a team mission statement and developed a framework for making our workload more manageable. Having more focus will allow us to progress higher priority work for multiple stakeholders and move the needle on more initiatives in a more efficient manner than how we are working right now. 

During the F2F we walked through the process of how to gracefully remove ourselves from applications that are not fitting our mission statement. The next couple of months will be a transition phase as we want to ensure continuity and cause minimum disruption to the community. To assist in that strategy, we analysed our applications and came up with four classifications to which they could belong.

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Outcome of the CPE’s team’s face-to-face

You may remember that we recently spoke about the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team and the problem it is facing — our workload is growing faster than the team can scale to meet it. From June 10th to June 14th most of the CPE team members met face to face in the Red Hat office in Waterford (Ireland)

We had a great week of meetings together with well balanced socializing times. We had a few outcomes from this meeting:

  • A mission statement
  • Agreements about lowering our workload with some candidate applications
  • Agreements about our new workflow
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Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #6

In the dungeons bellow the-new-hotness island was impenetrable darkness. It looks like somebody tried to destroy every source of light. Only my own levitating fireball was shedding some light around. Damage was still visible on walls and furniture, but most of it is now repaired to function properly. I’m glad that you are here with me, otherwise it will be a scary experience. But you probably want to hear what happened.

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State of the Community Platform Engineering team

About two years ago the Fedora Engineering team merged with the CentOS Engineering team to form what is now called the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team. For the team members, the day to day work did not change much.

The members working on Fedora are still fully dedicated to work on the Fedora Project, and those working on CentOS are still fully dedicated to CentOS. On both projects its members are involved in infrastructure, release engineering, and design. However, it brought the two infrastructures and teams closer to each other, allowing for more collaboration between them.

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Bodhi is getting ready for rawhide gating

For a couple of months, part of the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team has been focusing on making the changes needed in Bodhi to enable the rawhide gating change proposal.

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Chameleon and the dragons

Below you will find my report from openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) where I gave a talk Rust packaging: Cross-distro collaboration done right. Also I have decided to go some parts back on bicycle, so on the the bottom you will find story about that.

About conference

The openSUSE Conference is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from around the world together to meet and collaborate. The organized talks, workshops, and BoF sessions provide a framework around more casual meet ups and hack sessions. A party here and there provides the time to relax and have fun, making connections on a more personal level. The conference was held in Germany, in the very nice city — and origin of SUSE — Nuremberg (Nürnberg).

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Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #5

The desk in the wizard tower was full of manuscripts, reports from workers and written complaints from outside entities (users). It was a long week. I waved my hand to add more light to this room. Simple spell that is helping me to concentrate.

There was a figure in the door. “Come inside, traveler. I’m glad you are here. There are plenty of new things I want to share with you.”

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Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #4

The Future chamber was lit by hundreds of candles with strange symbols glowing on the walls. In the center of the chamber stood I, wearing the ceremonial robe and preparing for the task that lies before me.

Somebody opened the doors, I turned around to see, who that could be. “Oh, a pleasant surprise, traveler. Stand near the door and watch this, you will love it.” I focused back to my thoughts and added. “Today I will show you the future that is waiting for this realm, but first we need to see current situation to understand the changes.”

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Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #3

The darkness is slowly falling on my wizard tower, where I’m spending most of the time, when working on the new stuff in realm of the release-monitoring.org. But if you already arrived I could give you some of my time. You probably want to know what I’m working on. It’s not really a secret, but if you insist, I will tell you what happened in the realm in past weeks. So take a chair and hear my words.

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Integrating Fedora Messaging in Fedora Happiness Packets

The Federated Message Bus, or Fedmsg, is used within the Fedora Infrastructure to easily connect services using ZeroMQ publishers and subscribers. This library is now deprecated in favour of Fedora Messaging.

Fedora Messaging provides a framework for declaring message schemas and a set of APIs to publish and consume messages to and from AMQP brokers.

In the project Fedora Happiness Packets, Fedmsg was set up to send messages to the Bus so that Fedora Badges could be awarded to the sender when they send a Happiness Packet, i.e an email worth of appreciation! My piece in this jigsaw was to migrate from Fedmsg to Fedora Messaging in this containerized project.

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