Category: Council (page 1 of 2)

Fedora Council January 2020 in-person meeting

The Fedora Council stuck around Brno the day after DevConf.CZ to have a day-long working session. This is part of our newly-adopted regular cadence of in-person meetings. We mostly used this day to follow up on some items from the November meeting, including the vision statement.

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Fedora Council video meeting: Aoife Moloney talks about Red Hat’s CPE team, and we discuss COVID-19 plans

Every month, the Fedora Council holds a recorded video meeting where, in addition to normal business, we have a discussion with someone from the community about the area they work on. This month, we’re joined by Aiofe Moloney from Red Hat’s Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team. She walks us through that team’s workflow and plan for interaction with the community, while Matthew reveals secrets of Red Hat’s internal business organization. We also talk briefly about Fedora’s response to COVID-19 and our upcoming event sponsorships and attendance.

If you have suggestions for a future video meeting guest, please add them to the wish list.

Fedora Council and the future of Modularity

This is part four of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

Since the “should we switch to systemd” discussion has finally settled down, few things have inspired passionate conversations on the devel mailing list like Fedora Modularity. Developing Modularity has been a long process and we finally shipped “Modularity for Everyone” in Fedora 29. But we know there are a lot of rough edges, and it’s not surprising that the response hasn’t been completely enthusiastic. Let’s be honest: we’ve ended up in a situation where a lot of Fedora developers hate Modularity.

The Council agrees that Modularity serves a purpose that we really want to see Fedora, but we also understand the community frustrations. The packager experience is difficult, and handling upgrades needs additional work. We don’t want to throw away the work that’s been done, we want to take what’s there and make it work better.

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Let’s keep writing a new vision statement for Fedora

Last month, I shared a draft vision statement that the Fedora Council worked on during our face-to-face meeting in November. We got a lot of great feedback on the council-discuss list. When the Fedora Council met after DevConf.CZ, we went over the feedback and came up with a new draft:

The Fedora Project envisions a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities.

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Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: more miscellaneous stuff

This is part three of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

In addition to the big topic of the Fedora Project Vision, we used the opportunity to cover some other Fedora Council business. Because it’s a lot, we’re breaking the reporting on this into two posts, kind of arbitrarily — here’s the second of those.

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Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: Councily business

This is part two of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

In addition to the big topic of the Fedora Project Vision, we used the opportunity to cover some other Fedora Council business. Because it’s a lot, we’re breaking the reporting on this into two posts, kind of arbitrarily — here’s the first of those.

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Let’s write a new vision statement for Fedora

This is part one of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

A few years ago, the Fedora Council set out to update the project’s guiding statements. At the time, we were particularly focused on the mission statement, because we felt that what we had previously was too broad to be actionable. The result of that is:

Fedora creates an innovative platform for hardware, clouds, and containers that enables software developers and community members to build tailored solutions for their users.

… which we quite like. But, this focus has somewhat of a downside: it’s functional but not particularly inspiring. It talks about what we’re doing, but not much about the why. So, this year, we worked on a new vision statement to serve as the proverbial “banner on a hilltop” that we can use to rally our existing community and to attract new contributors.

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Fedora status updates: November 2019

Welcome to the monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the weekly updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

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October 2019: Fedora status updates

Welcome to the monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the weekly updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

Mindshare committee

So far this year, the Mindshare committee has approved all 12 event requests that have been filed. Three requests for swag-only have been approved. The community is reminded that Mindshare is there to help fund events and they can only do that if they’re asked.

On a related note, Sumantro Mukherjee published a Community Blog post calling for Fedora 31 release parties. Fedora 31 is scheduled for release later this month, so now is a good time to start planning release parties.

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) and Outreachy were completed successfully. The Mindshare committee is working on combining GSoC, Outreachy, and Google Code-In efforts under a single “mentored projects” umbrella.

Minimization objective

In the past month, the Minimization team brought the “feedback pipeline” to life. Feedback Pipeline gives a quick overview of the use cases we’re targeting to minimize. It shows required packages, their dependencies, the overall size, and allows a deeper inspection with interactive dependency graphs. As part of that work, the team is working on identifying use cases to target.

The Council approved the Minimization objective on a short-term basis. Adam Šamalík will be submitting a proposal for the next phase of this objective to the Council soon.

Fedora Silverblue

The Silverblue team is working on Fedora Flatpak preinstallation. Some patches are pending into the Fedora infrastructure to help enable this. The goal is to have the same preinstalled applications as Fedora Workstation.

In addition, planning for Fedora 32 Silverblue is underway. The team has a Kanban board available to the community.

Renewing the Modularity objective

Now that Modularity is available for all Fedora variants, it’s time to address issues discovered and improve the experience for packagers and users. The Modularity team identified a number of projects that will improve the usefulness of Modularity and the experience of creating modules for packagers. We are proposing a renewed objective to the Fedora Council.

You can read the updated objective in pull request #61. Please provide feedback there or on the devel mailing list. The Council will vote on this in two weeks.

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