Category: Events (page 1 of 18)

All articles in this category are related to any all events in Fedora, whether they be in-person or remote (e.g. Fedora Activity Days, Flock, FUDCons). https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Events

DevConf.CZ and Open TestCon CfPs open

The calls for proposals for both DevConf.CZ (24–26 January in Brno, CZ) and Open TestCon (30–31 March in Beijing, CN) are open through the end of the month. These Red Hat-sponsored conferences are a great opportunity to share your knowledge and experience with the community.

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Fedora 31: Let’s have an awesome release party!

Fedora 31 will be released soon. It’s time to start planing activities around the release.

The most common activity to do is organize release parties. A release party is also a great way for other contributors in the community to get involved with advocacy in their local regions. Learn how to organize a release party and get a badge for it in this article.

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Flock to Fedora ’19

Attending a tech conference is not what I’ve experienced before, but I’m sure I’ll keep doing so forever. Flock ‘19 was an amazing one to start with, meeting a flock with same interest always gets you an amazing time. I’ll be sharing down some of the things that I took away from Flock to Fedora ‘19

The community planned a tonne of talks for everyone to attend, unfortunately, it was impossible to attend all of them. These are the talks that I decided to attend.

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Modularity at Flock 2019

The Modularity Team was able to hold a session at Flock 2019 to gather feedback and discuss a few issues. The session was well attended and there was a bunch of great discussion.

We started out by spending 15 minutes, measured on a stopwatch(!) gathering the most pressing issues. The audience and the panel came up with quite a few ideas.

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Living my best 4 days: Flock to Fedora 2019

Months of waiting came to an end and finally, it was time to meet people with whom I have been working for the last four months, being on the other side of the screen. Things seemed different when our last Wednesday conference call ended with “Meet you soon” instead of a “Good Day”. The excitement of attending Flock to Fedora was not only because the virtual interaction is turning to the real meeting but also, it was my first ever International trip. With approaching the 6th of August, the fear of travelling solo was getting on the peak, and at one moment I started questioning if all the trouble I underwent during last month was even worth it. But the time I met Shraddha (another intern working on the same project) at Bangalore airport, we happened to click so much at our first conversation that it was certain that at least my journey will not be me and my headphones all the time. 

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Flock to Fedora ’19

I had a wonderful opportunity to go to Fedora’s annual contributor summit, Flock to Fedora in Budapest, Hungary. This is me penning down my takeaway from a week full of learning!

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CPE Team at Flock

Flock is just around the corner and the CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team will be there to join our Community at our annual event. We are also going to be presenting some talks around work that we are involved with and we have one hackfest ready. Let’s go look at what we have in our sleeves for you and hopefully you will join us at these sessions!

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Flock to Budapest

I hear many of you are coming to Budapest. Here’s a quick overview and collection of links to help you easily get to Flock’s venue (district XIII, Kárpát utca 62-64).

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Modularity at Flock 2019

Come and discuss Modularity at Flock! There are three sessions ready that will help you decide when to make a module, how to make them, and a discussion about making everything Modularity work better.

Talk: Modularity: modularize or not to modularize?

Are you a maintainer of packages in Fedora and can’t decide when to use modules? Well, this talk is right for you. In about 15 minutes it will cover a few specific use cases and demonstrate what Modularity solves and what it doesn’t. We’ll have about 30 minutes to discuss any other topics the audience comes up with.

Talk: Tools for Making Modules in Fedora

If you decided you want to use modules, this might be a talk for you. Merlin will walk you through the steps of putting together a module, building it, testing it, and more! All of this in 25 minutes!

Hack: Modularity & Packager Experience BoF

Making modules has not been always an easy process. The technology is very new and there are still some things to finish. Come and help us make it better! We’ll have half a day dedicated to discuss, design, make plans, hack, and more.

Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.2. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, July 22, 2019 through Monday, July 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

How does a test week work?

A test day/week is an event where anyone can help make sure changes in Fedora work well in an upcoming release. Fedora community members often participate, and the public is welcome at these events. If you’ve never contributed before, this is a perfect way to get started.

To contribute, you only need to be able to do the following things:

  • Download test materials, which include some large files
  • Read and follow directions step by step

The wiki page for the kernel test day has a lot of good information on what and how to test. After you’ve done some testing, you can log your results in the test day web application. If you’re available on or around the day of the event, please do some testing and report your results.

Happy testing, and we hope to see you on test day.

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