Category: Development (page 1 of 10)

All articles in this category are related to the various Development teams in the Fedora Project, such as package maintainers, quality assurance, and more. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Development

Accidental EOL bug closures

As you’re probably aware, Fedora 29 reached End-of-Life (EOL) status yesterday. The Fedora Program Manager (that’s me!) is responsible for closing any bugs that are still open against that version. Typically, several thousand bugs remain open, so there is a script to do this. This morning, I accidentally closed bugs as EOL that should not have been closed. In the interests of community transparency, I want to share what happened.

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September 2019: Fedora status updates

Welcome to the first of a monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the weekly updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Django, Docker, and fedora-messaging

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

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Rawhide package gating — phase I begins

On July 25th we will turn on the first phase of Rawhide package gating: single build updates. In a later phase, Rawhide updates that contain multiple builds will also be enabled for gating. Our goal is to improve our ability to continuously turn out a useful Fedora OS. So we hope and expect to get opt-in from as many Fedora package maintainers as possible, including maintainers of the base OS. But this phase of gating remains opt-in, and should not affect packagers who choose for now not to opt in.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Pytest, UI enhancements, FAS search

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

Continue reading

Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

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Modularity vs. libgit

Fire! Libgit can’t be installed, module changes are being temporarily reverted, and one of our great contributors are thinking about moving their packages out of Fedora.

This blog post has been written to summarize the problem, explain how we got here, offer potential solutions that would work right now, and to set a common ground for a discussion on the devel list about how to address this and similar problems properly.

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Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

This blog post summaries what I’ve completed in Phase 1 in my Outreachy internship with Fedora Happiness Packets, things I learned and the challenges I faced 🙂

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Fedora Gooey Karma Week 2 report GSoC

  • Fedora Account: imzubin
  • IRC: iamzubin || iamzubin_ (found in #fedora-summer-coding, #fedora-devel, #fedora-qa )
  • Fedora User Wiki Page
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Chameleon and the dragons

Below you will find my report from openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) where I gave a talk Rust packaging: Cross-distro collaboration done right. Also I have decided to go some parts back on bicycle, so on the the bottom you will find story about that.

About conference

The openSUSE Conference is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from around the world together to meet and collaborate. The organized talks, workshops, and BoF sessions provide a framework around more casual meet ups and hack sessions. A party here and there provides the time to relax and have fun, making connections on a more personal level. The conference was held in Germany, in the very nice city — and origin of SUSE — Nuremberg (Nürnberg).

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