Author: Matthew Miller (page 1 of 2)

Fedora Council and the git forge

I love the passion the Fedora Project inspires in our community. That passion has been on display in the past week as the community has discussed the decision to move forward with GitLab as our git forge. I want to be very clear: we, the Fedora Council, dropped the ball on communication here. No one intended to be secretive or hide from the community, but we should have done better.

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Fedora Council January 2020 in-person meeting

The Fedora Council stuck around Brno the day after DevConf.CZ to have a day-long working session. This is part of our newly-adopted regular cadence of in-person meetings. We mostly used this day to follow up on some items from the November meeting, including the vision statement.

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On being part of the Fedora community

Hi, everyone. As I am sure you know, I often say that the “Friends” value of the Fedora Foundations is the one that’s personally most important to me. I want to remind everyone that when you are a Fedora contributor — a developer, a writer, an advocate, or any other role in our community — it’s important to keep the spirit of “be excellent to each other” in mind.

Our Code of Conduct says: members of the Fedora community should be respectful when dealing with other contributors as well as with people outside the Fedora community and with users of Fedora. Please be extra-aware of how your actions even outside of our mailing lists, forums, and channels reflect upon Fedora as a whole.

We just adopted a new vision statement: The Fedora Project envisions a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities.  We are continually working to make Fedora an inclusive place where all are welcome. I wish it did not need to be said, but here it is: personal attacks, innuendo, and inciting language are examples of things that do not create a welcoming community, and will not be tolerated in Fedora. We understand that even friends can disagree at times, and that emotions can lead to escalation. The Code of Conduct ticket queue is a safe place where folks can open up an issue to resolve difficult situations. Please make use of it if you ever feel it is warranted.

As I mentioned on the magazine, these are uncertain times in the face of Covid-19. It is more important than ever that we care for and treat each other well, as we are on the internet working virtually more than ever. On a final note- I am sending more well wishes for the health and safety of our Fedora family. Remember to be excellent to each other. Thanks!

— Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader

Fedora Council video meeting: Aoife Moloney talks about Red Hat’s CPE team, and we discuss COVID-19 plans

Every month, the Fedora Council holds a recorded video meeting where, in addition to normal business, we have a discussion with someone from the community about the area they work on. This month, we’re joined by Aiofe Moloney from Red Hat’s Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team. She walks us through that team’s workflow and plan for interaction with the community, while Matthew reveals secrets of Red Hat’s internal business organization. We also talk briefly about Fedora’s response to COVID-19 and our upcoming event sponsorships and attendance.

If you have suggestions for a future video meeting guest, please add them to the wish list.

Fedora Council and the future of Modularity

This is part four of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

Since the “should we switch to systemd” discussion has finally settled down, few things have inspired passionate conversations on the devel mailing list like Fedora Modularity. Developing Modularity has been a long process and we finally shipped “Modularity for Everyone” in Fedora 29. But we know there are a lot of rough edges, and it’s not surprising that the response hasn’t been completely enthusiastic. Let’s be honest: we’ve ended up in a situation where a lot of Fedora developers hate Modularity.

The Council agrees that Modularity serves a purpose that we really want to see Fedora, but we also understand the community frustrations. The packager experience is difficult, and handling upgrades needs additional work. We don’t want to throw away the work that’s been done, we want to take what’s there and make it work better.

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Let’s keep writing a new vision statement for Fedora

Last month, I shared a draft vision statement that the Fedora Council worked on during our face-to-face meeting in November. We got a lot of great feedback on the council-discuss list. When the Fedora Council met after DevConf.CZ, we went over the feedback and came up with a new draft:

The Fedora Project envisions a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities.

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Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: more miscellaneous stuff

This is part three of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

In addition to the big topic of the Fedora Project Vision, we used the opportunity to cover some other Fedora Council business. Because it’s a lot, we’re breaking the reporting on this into two posts, kind of arbitrarily — here’s the second of those.

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Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: Councily business

This is part two of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

In addition to the big topic of the Fedora Project Vision, we used the opportunity to cover some other Fedora Council business. Because it’s a lot, we’re breaking the reporting on this into two posts, kind of arbitrarily — here’s the first of those.

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Let’s write a new vision statement for Fedora

This is part one of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

A few years ago, the Fedora Council set out to update the project’s guiding statements. At the time, we were particularly focused on the mission statement, because we felt that what we had previously was too broad to be actionable. The result of that is:

Fedora creates an innovative platform for hardware, clouds, and containers that enables software developers and community members to build tailored solutions for their users.

… which we quite like. But, this focus has somewhat of a downside: it’s functional but not particularly inspiring. It talks about what we’re doing, but not much about the why. So, this year, we worked on a new vision statement to serve as the proverbial “banner on a hilltop” that we can use to rally our existing community and to attract new contributors.

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Fedora booth at Red Hat Summit

Red Hat Summit — the annual conference for Red Hat customers, partners, and open source contributors — took place last month in Boston, Massachusetts. Fedora had space in the Community Central booth on the expo floor and we had a lot of great conversations with our community.

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