Author: Matthew Miller (page 1 of 3)

Fedora’s default license for content is now CC BY-SA 4.0

The Fedora Project Contributor Agreement (FPCA), which all Fedora contributors sign, exists to make sure that everything in the project is licensed in accordance with our “Freedom” value. The FPCA includes a provision which allows the Council to update the default license for either “code” or “content”:

The Fedora Council may, by public announcement, subsequently designate an additional or alternative default license for a given category of Contribution (a “Later Default License”). A Later Default License shall be chosen from the appropriate categorical sublist of Acceptable Licenses For Fedora.

The Fedora Council has approved a change from from the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) license to the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 (CC BY-SA 4.0) license for material classified as “content”. This message is the official public announcement of that change, which is effective as of today, the 13th of May 2021.

This license applies to content (not code) submitted to Fedora that does not have an explicit license attached. The FPCA is not a copyright assignment, and does not override the explicit license choices of contributors or upstream projects.

Fedora Council March 2021 meeting

In a normal year, the Fedora Council would have held a one-day meeting in Brno the day after DevConf.CZ. Since this isn’t a normal year, we held a half day virtual face-to-face earlier this month. Unlike the longer November meeting, this meeting focused on catching up on a few things instead of larger strategy planning. As usual, the minutes have been fed to Zodbot.

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Fedora is a community; Fedora Linux is our OS

When I talk about the Fedora Project, I’m talking about you: the community. The Linux distribution we make is great, but the community is the key. When people say “Fedora” without a qualifier, I’d like them to think “Fedora Project”, not the bits we produce. What’s more, we make more than just one thing — EPEL, for example, plus artwork, documentation, websites, and tools which aren’t tightly tied to the OS itself.

Over the years, we haven’t done a great job of drawing this distinction. Now, let’s be more intentional with our language.

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Fedora Council November 2020 meeting

As usual, the Fedora Council held an annual strategy meeting last month. And as usual for 2020, we had to conduct it virtually. Instead of meeting somewhere in person for a few packed days, we decided to split it into several half days over a few weeks.  Ben Cotton, the apparently untiring Fedora Program Manager (FPgM), already published the minutes through Zodbot. In this post, I’ll cover some of the discussion in more detail.

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Contributor discount for Lenovo ThinkPad laptops with Fedora Workstation!

It’s been a little longer than we hoped, but Lenovo is now shipping the ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 8 with Fedora Workstation preinstalled, purchasable via their website. (Currently US and Canada only, but will be world-wide. Also only this model for now, with the other models to follow.)

We’ll have some another announcements, but I wanted to share something important for Fedora contributors. There is a special Linux community portal, and if you purchase through that portal, you’ll get a (pretty significant!) discount. You just need to log in with your accountname@fedoraproject.org address (something you should have if you qualify for “CLA+1“).

This is live now: simply go to https://www.lenovo.com/us/en/Linux in the US or www.lenovo.com/ca/en/linuxca in Canada, and create an account using your Fedora email alias. Thanks to Lenovo for offering this to all Fedora contributors as a way of giving back.

Note that you must use this portal to get the extra discount. Simply using an @fedoraproject.org email address isn’t enough.

— Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader

Fedora Council August 2020 meeting

Every year in the days before Flock, the Fedora Council holds a face-to-face meeting. We had expected to do this in Detroit this year, but… you know… COVID. Instead, we held a virtual face-to-face over two half-days. Unlike in past meetings, there was little Big New Idea discussion to have. Instead, this meeting focused on catching up on work in progress. Minutes are available in the Zodbot archives.

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Fedora Council and the git forge

I love the passion the Fedora Project inspires in our community. That passion has been on display in the past week as the community has discussed the decision to move forward with GitLab as our git forge. I want to be very clear: we, the Fedora Council, dropped the ball on communication here. No one intended to be secretive or hide from the community, but we should have done better.

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Fedora Council January 2020 in-person meeting

The Fedora Council stuck around Brno the day after DevConf.CZ to have a day-long working session. This is part of our newly-adopted regular cadence of in-person meetings. We mostly used this day to follow up on some items from the November meeting, including the vision statement.

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On being part of the Fedora community

Hi, everyone. As I am sure you know, I often say that the “Friends” value of the Fedora Foundations is the one that’s personally most important to me. I want to remind everyone that when you are a Fedora contributor — a developer, a writer, an advocate, or any other role in our community — it’s important to keep the spirit of “be excellent to each other” in mind.

Our Code of Conduct says: members of the Fedora community should be respectful when dealing with other contributors as well as with people outside the Fedora community and with users of Fedora. Please be extra-aware of how your actions even outside of our mailing lists, forums, and channels reflect upon Fedora as a whole.

We just adopted a new vision statement: The Fedora Project envisions a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities.  We are continually working to make Fedora an inclusive place where all are welcome. I wish it did not need to be said, but here it is: personal attacks, innuendo, and inciting language are examples of things that do not create a welcoming community, and will not be tolerated in Fedora. We understand that even friends can disagree at times, and that emotions can lead to escalation. The Code of Conduct ticket queue is a safe place where folks can open up an issue to resolve difficult situations. Please make use of it if you ever feel it is warranted.

As I mentioned on the magazine, these are uncertain times in the face of Covid-19. It is more important than ever that we care for and treat each other well, as we are on the internet working virtually more than ever. On a final note- I am sending more well wishes for the health and safety of our Fedora family. Remember to be excellent to each other. Thanks!

— Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader

Fedora Council video meeting: Aoife Moloney talks about Red Hat’s CPE team, and we discuss COVID-19 plans

Every month, the Fedora Council holds a recorded video meeting where, in addition to normal business, we have a discussion with someone from the community about the area they work on. This month, we’re joined by Aiofe Moloney from Red Hat’s Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team. She walks us through that team’s workflow and plan for interaction with the community, while Matthew reveals secrets of Red Hat’s internal business organization. We also talk briefly about Fedora’s response to COVID-19 and our upcoming event sponsorships and attendance.

If you have suggestions for a future video meeting guest, please add them to the wish list.

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