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CPE Weekly Update – Week 32 2022

This is a weekly report from the CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team. If you have any questions or feedback, please respond to this report or contact us on #redhat-cpe channel on libera.chat (https://libera.chat/).

Week: 8th – 12th August 2022

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Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2022-32

Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

Announcements

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Fedora Linux 38 development schedule

Fedora Linux 37 branches from Rawhide today. While there’s still a lot of work before the Fedora Linux 37 release in October, this marks the beginning of the Fedora Linux 38 development cycle. The work you do in Rawhide will be in the Fedora Linux 38 release in April.

With that in mind, here are some important milestones:

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Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2022-31

Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

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CPE Weekly Update – Week 31 2022

This is a weekly report from the CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team. If you have any questions or feedback, please respond to this report or contact us on #redhat-cpe channel on libera.chat (https://libera.chat/).

Week: 1st – 5th August 2022

Highlights of the week

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Community Blog monthly summary: July 2022

This is the latest in our monthly series summarizing the past month on the Community Blog. Please leave a comment below to let me know what you think.

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Nest with Fedora 2022: Thanks to our Sponsors!

Fedora’s annual contributor conference Nest with Fedora 2022 is occurring August 4th–6th. Even with the virtual format, we are so excited to see everyone together, so don’t forget to register! Nest with Fedora is made possible by funding from our sponsors. Their assistance brings us everything from the conference platform to promotion to swag.

A big “Thank You!” goes to our astounding sponsors for their support in bringing Fedora Friends together in 2022. Thank you Red Hat, Lenovo, AlmaLinux, openSUSE, GitLab, Datto, and Das Keyboard.

We also want to thank TuxDigital, GNOME, KDE, and Opensource.com for being our amazing media partners for this event and helping us reach a bigger audience.

Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2022-30

Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

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Important changes to software license information in Fedora packages (SPDX and more!)

On behalf of all of the folks working on Fedora licensing improvements, I have a few things to announce!

New docs site for licensing and other legal topics

All documentation related to Fedora licensing has moved to a new section in Fedora Docs, which you can find at https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/legal/. Other legal documentation will follow. This follows the overall Fedora goal of moving active user and contributor documentation away from the wiki.

Fedora license information in a structured format

The “good” (allowed) and “bad” (not-allowed) licenses for Fedora are now stored in a repository, using a simple structured file format for each license (it’s TOML). You can find this at https://gitlab.com/fedora/legal/fedora-license-data. This data is then presented in easy tabular format in the documentation, at https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/legal/allowed-licenses/.

Historically, this information was listed in tables on the Fedora Wiki. This was hard to maintain and was not conducive to using the data in other ways. This format will enable automation for license validation and other similar process improvements.

New policy for the License field in packages — SPDX identifiers!

We’re changing the policy for the “License” field in package spec files to use SPDX license identifiers. Historically, Fedora has represented licenses using short abbreviations specific to Fedora. In the meantime, SPDX license identifiers have emerged as a standard, and other projects, vendors, and developers have started using them. Adopting SPDX license identifiers provides greater accuracy as to what license applies, and will make it easier for us to collaborate with other projects.

Updated licensing policies and processes

Fedora licensing policies and processes have been updated to reflect the above changes. In some cases, this forced deeper thought as to how these things are decided and why, which led to various discussion on Fedora mailing lists. In other cases, it prompted better articulation of guidance that was implicitly understood but not necessarily explicitly stated. 

New guidance on “effective license” analysis

Many software packages consist of code with different free and open source licenses. Previous practice often involved  “simplification” of the package license field when the packager believed  that one license subsumed the other — for example, using just “GPL” when the source code includes parts licensed under a BSD-style license as well. Going forward, packagers and reviewers should not make this kind of analysis, and rather use (for example) “GPL-2.0-or-later AND MIT”. This approach is easier for packagers to apply in a consistent way. 

When do these changes take effect?

The resulting changes in practice will be applied to new packages and licenses going forward. It is not necessary to revise existing packages at this time, although we have provided some guidance for package maintainers who want to get started. We’re in the process of planning a path for updating existing packages at a larger scale — stay tuned for more on that!

Thank you everyone!

A huge thanks to some key people who have worked tirelessly to make this happen: David Cantrell, Richard Fontana, Jilayne Lovejoy, Miroslav Suchý. Behind the scenes support was also provided by David Levine, Bryan Sutula, and Beatriz Couto. Thank you as well for the valuable feedback from Fedora community members in various Fedora forums. 

Please have a look at the updated information. If you have questions, please post them to the Fedora Legal mailing list: https://lists.fedoraproject.org/archives/list/legal@lists.fedoraproject.org/ 

CPE Weekly Update – Week 30 2022

This is a weekly report from the CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team. If you have any questions or feedback, please respond to this report or contact us on #redhat-cpe channel on libera.chat (https://libera.chat/).

Week: 25th July – 29th July 2022

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