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FPgM report: 2019-07

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

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News from Fedora Infrastructure

Most of the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team met in person last month in Brno during a week. CPE team is the team at Red Hat that works on Fedora and CentOS infrastructure. As a distributed team, we usually use DevConf.cz as an opportunity to meet face to face.

This is an update on what we have been up to during this week.

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Draft Fedora 31 schedule available

It’s almost time for me to submit the Fedora 31 schedule to FESCo for approval. Before I do that, I’m sharing it with the community for comment. After some discussion before the end of the year, we decided not to go with an extended development cycle for Fedora 31. After getting input from teams within Fedora, I have a draft schedule available.

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FPgM report: 2019-06

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Announcements

Meetings

Fedora 30 Status

  • Mass rebuild is underway.
  • Code complete (testable) deadline is 2019-02-19.
  • Code complete (100%) deadline is 2019-03-05.

Fedora 30 includes a Change that will cause ambiguous python shebangs to error.  A list of failing builds is available on Taskotron.

Fedora 30 includes a Change that will remove glibc langpacks from the buildroot. See the devel mailing list for more information and impacted packages.

Changes

Submitted to FESCo

Approved by FESCo

Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 2: What does this mean for me?

This post is part of an FAQ series about the updated strategic direction published by the Fedora Council.

The Council’s updated strategic direction guidance is intentionally high-level, which means you probably have a lot of questions about what it actually means for you. If you’re a Fedora packager or a software developer, here’s some more concrete answers.

What does this mean for Packagers and other groups like them?

Packagers remain free to provide software at the versions and cadence they wish. However, that doesn’t mean they can block others providing the same software in different versions and cadence. For example, if you only want to work on the very latest version of a particular piece of software as it comes from upstream, that’s cool — but you have to leave room for someone else who wants to maintaining older releases of that same software.

This isn’t necessarily new — we’ve seen this with, for example, co-maintainers where one person works on the main Fedora OS package and someone else maintains an EPEL branch. But this goes further with features and even bugs. Perhaps a Fedora solution like CoreOS or the Fedora KDE Plasma desktop needs a slightly different version than the “main” one to enable (or strip down) some particular feature. That’s okay! We have multiple stream branches to allow this.

The same is true for changes and other ideas, including greater automation in packaging. Perhaps someone wants to provide a stream where updates are automatically triggered when upstream makes a release. Or maybe someone wants to try out a whole new way of generating specfiles from templates. We don’t block people out, instead we provide options.  There is no obligation for packagers or others to provide all possible options, but we also don’t want to restrict those options from being provided by someone who is interested.

What does this mean for software developers?

Software developers will be able to use Fedora to develop software by selecting the building blocks that make their development environment.  These development environments are essentially highly-tailored solutions with extremely specific applicability. Additionally, the output of software development is a building block that other solutions can use.

Ideally, Fedora becomes the reference architecture for the next generation of software development. More flexibility in package branches will make that possible — if what we have isn’t a perfect match, there can be options within the project rather than requiring people to instead look elsewhere.

Design new Fedora Badges with the style guide

This week, the Fedora Badges team published a full walk-through of how to design new Fedora Badges on the Fedora Docs site. The walk-through is the best reference to use when designing new badges. It includes the following:

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Open Power Summit 2018 event report

With some rather unfortunate delays is my report from last year’s Open Power Summit. Let’s dive in it, without further delay.

It took place between 3th and 4th October 2018 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. It is event organized by the Open Power Foundation, steward of the Open Power CPU ISA. It is open and builds on top of the heritage of the past Power architectures, enabling any vendor or individual to dive in to the technical deeps of it or even implement it on their own.

 At the venue there have been booths of different foundation members and affiliated organizations. Like Raptor engineering with their Talos II and Blackbird platforms on showcase, Mellanox with accelerators cards, Yadro with big-data memory(RAM) dense servers or OpenCAPI consortium with bunch of accelerators from various manufacturers that are leveraging the OpenCAPI standard, just to note few. To add on the OpenCAPI it is open offspring of the CAPI that has been introduced by IBM with their Power8 architecture.

OpenCAPI booth
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FPgM report: 2019-05

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Continue reading

Call for Projects and Mentors – GSoC 2019

Fedora at Google Summer of Code 2019

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development.
Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.  In the previous year, Fedora had an awesome participation
and we would like to continue to be mentoring Org this year too.

Fedora needs your help!

Fedora is currently looking for mentors and projects, it’s very starightforward to propose yourself as a mentor and a project.
The project encourages mentors to come forward and propose project ideas by 2019-02-06. More deatils are given below.

How to Propose a Project?

If you want to mentor a specific project, think carefully about several things:

  • Do you have enough time to work on this with the student during the entire project.
    You will be helping someone else when they get stuck. You don’t want to become a blocker because you’re busy.
  • It is harder to find success when you are completely certain of how an idea needs to be implemented; finding a student with the skills and interest to implement a specific solution is a lot harder than finding a student with enough skills to respond to a use case need. Also, students learn more when they help design and guide the project. In other words, provide guidance and direction but let the student do some of the “driving.”
  • Where you can have looser ideas, you may be able to find a student who works as a sort-of intern who can implement a solution to a use case you have. In past experiences, students going after a use case are more likely to get somewhere with self-direction and support from you.
  • Who can help you?

Try to find a second mentor for the project.

If you’re interested in working with a student on a specific project you should post your idea to the Mentored Projects Issue Tracker. Your issue should be tagged GSoC and use the Google Summer of Code template. We strongly encourage you to find a second person to help with mentoring and to solicit feedback on your proposal

Can I be a Mentor Without a Project?

Yes! You can either:

Work with a student who brings an idea to your sub-project. This requires a different level of communication throughout the project, but can be the most rewarding.

Be a general mentor. This is a person who works with all students regardless of their project. To become a general mentor please open an issue in the Mentored Projects Issue Tracker offering your help. Please tag the issue with the GSoC tag.

FPgM report: 2019-04

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Self-Contained Change proposals are due on Tuesday, 29 January.

I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

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