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Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-13

Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)! The Final freeze begins Tuesday.

I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

Remember that many locations are changing to/from summer time in the next few weeks.

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Save the date: Fedora Linux 34 Release Party!

On the tail of the release of Fedora Linux 34 Beta, I am excited to announce that we will be celebrating the final release of Fedora Linux 34 with a virtual Release Party! Join us April 30th & May 1st for a series of sessions on the new features in F34 as well as some of the latest news and developments in Fedora. Make sure to save the dates and register on Hopin to party with Fedora!

There will be more details coming shortly, but you can expect to enjoy sessions on topics such as Fedora KDE, i3, Fedora Zine, and the new Fedora logo. We will also have a series of our favorite socials, including a pub quiz and a couple game sessions. Lastly, look forward to testing out a new Hallway Track solution that should be a lot of fun and bring some spontaneity to the event!

Ask Fedora retrospective – 2020

In the first quarter of 2019, we officially moved the Ask Fedora user support web site to Discourse. You can read more about the migration on the Ask Fedora Retrospective – 2019 published last year.

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Policy proposal: Update default content license to CC BY-SA 4.0

Earlier this month, Matthew Miller suggested the Fedora Council update the default content license from the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) license to the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 (CC BY-SA 4.0) license. This license applies to content (not code) submitted to Fedora that does not have an explicit license attached. It does not override the explicit license choices of contributors or upstream projects.

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Fedora Council March 2021 meeting

In a normal year, the Fedora Council would have held a one-day meeting in Brno the day after DevConf.CZ. Since this isn’t a normal year, we held a half day virtual face-to-face earlier this month. Unlike the longer November meeting, this meeting focused on catching up on a few things instead of larger strategy planning. As usual, the minutes have been fed to Zodbot.

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Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-12

Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)! The Final freeze begins 6 April.

I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

Remember that many locations are changing to/from summer time in the next few weeks.

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Community Survey Results Summary

As a part of the Community Outreach Revamp the Objective co-leads, Mariana (marianab) and Sumantro (sumantrom) along with FCIAC, Marie Nordin (riecatnor), tried to capture the “bright spots” of what motivated the engagement of Fedora Ambassadors. The team approached the situation by developing a set of questions and implementing a community survey.

The idea was to primarily capture:

  • Why people do outreach for Fedora
  • How people participate in outreach currently
  • What do people want to be doing for outreach

The community survey received over 40 complete responses (over 100 incomplete) and the results we found provided some interesting and clear insights for the Revamp. The co-leads, FCAIC, along with Vipul (siddharthvipul1), Ashlyn (lilyx), Alberto (bt0dotninja) and Sayak (sayak), spent several meetings analyzing the responses question by question.

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Fedora Women’s Day 2020 Reflection

Fedora Women’s Day 2020 was a celebration of personal growth, community, and love for open source software. Over three days, women and non-binary folks from the Fedora community shared stories about their lives and work in tech. From the challenges and barriers that they encountered to the achievements and success that they earned, we had the privilege of learning about gendered experiences that informed the journey of each of our speakers.

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How to rebase to Fedora Silverblue 34 Beta

Silverblue is an operating system for your desktop built on Fedora Linux. It’s excellent for daily use, development, and container-based workflows. It offers numerous advantages such as being able to roll back in case of any problems. If you want to update to F34 Beta on your Silverblue system, this article tells you how. It not only shows you what to do, but also how to revert back if anything unforeseen happens.

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tmt hints: create a basic test

For those who still haven’t heard: tmt is now fully-supported in Packit, Fedora Continuous Integration (CI) system, and the RHEL CI system. Now you can use the same concise and consistent config to enable tests across all of them, more easily open source tests, share test coverage across releases ,and run tests as early as possible.

In the coming weeks we’ll be sharing short, bite-sized examples demonstrating tmt usage. With these, new users can get started quickly and existing users won’t miss various interesting and useful features hidden under the hood.

Here we go with the first set of examples showing how to quickly enable a simple smoke test for your component, assuming you are in your project git repository:

    sudo dnf install -y tmt
    cd git/fedora/rpms/foo
    tmt init --template mini
    vim plans/example.fmf

Adjust the example plan to run the desired command:

    summary: Basic smoke test
    execute:
        script: foo --version

The very minimal config is really just two lines:

    execute:
        script: make test

Now submit the pull request and wait for the results:

    git add .
    git checkout -b smoke-test
    git commit -m "Enable a simple smoke test"
    git push fork -u smoke-test

Eager to learn more? Not patient enough to wait for the results from the CI pipeline? Willing to safely execute tests from your laptop right now? Check the rest of the first chapter of our brand new guide to learn more.

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