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Flock to Budapest

I hear many of you are coming to Budapest. Here’s a quick overview and collection of links to help you easily get to Flock’s venue (district XIII, Kárpát utca 62-64).

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Modularity at Flock 2019

Come and discuss Modularity at Flock! There are three sessions ready that will help you decide when to make a module, how to make them, and a discussion about making everything Modularity work better.

Talk: Modularity: modularize or not to modularize?

Are you a maintainer of packages in Fedora and can’t decide when to use modules? Well, this talk is right for you. In about 15 minutes it will cover a few specific use cases and demonstrate what Modularity solves and what it doesn’t. We’ll have about 30 minutes to discuss any other topics the audience comes up with.

Talk: Tools for Making Modules in Fedora

If you decided you want to use modules, this might be a talk for you. Merlin will walk you through the steps of putting together a module, building it, testing it, and more! All of this in 25 minutes!

Hack: Modularity & Packager Experience BoF

Making modules has not been always an easy process. The technology is very new and there are still some things to finish. Come and help us make it better! We’ll have half a day dedicated to discuss, design, make plans, hack, and more.

Outreachy FHP week 7: Django, Docker, and fedora-messaging

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

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Fedora Localization project status and horizons

L10n (short for “localization”) is the Fedora sub-project dedicated to translation. It is unique in its form and organization because under this label are a set of autonomous teams of speakers. Some statistics will show you the reduction of our community, and invite you to come discuss with us at Flock.

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FPgM report: 2019-30

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. The mass rebuild is underway.

I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

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Rawhide package gating — phase I begins

On July 25th we will turn on the first phase of Rawhide package gating: single build updates. In a later phase, Rawhide updates that contain multiple builds will also be enabled for gating. Our goal is to improve our ability to continuously turn out a useful Fedora OS. So we hope and expect to get opt-in from as many Fedora package maintainers as possible, including maintainers of the base OS. But this phase of gating remains opt-in, and should not affect packagers who choose for now not to opt in.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Pytest, UI enhancements, FAS search

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

Continue reading

Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.2. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, July 22, 2019 through Monday, July 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

How does a test week work?

A test day/week is an event where anyone can help make sure changes in Fedora work well in an upcoming release. Fedora community members often participate, and the public is welcome at these events. If you’ve never contributed before, this is a perfect way to get started.

To contribute, you only need to be able to do the following things:

  • Download test materials, which include some large files
  • Read and follow directions step by step

The wiki page for the kernel test day has a lot of good information on what and how to test. After you’ve done some testing, you can log your results in the test day web application. If you’re available on or around the day of the event, please do some testing and report your results.

Happy testing, and we hope to see you on test day.

Application service categories and community handoff

The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team recently wrote about our face-to-face meeting where we developed a team mission statement and developed a framework for making our workload more manageable. Having more focus will allow us to progress higher priority work for multiple stakeholders and move the needle on more initiatives in a more efficient manner than how we are working right now. 

During the F2F we walked through the process of how to gracefully remove ourselves from applications that are not fitting our mission statement. The next couple of months will be a transition phase as we want to ensure continuity and cause minimum disruption to the community. To assist in that strategy, we analysed our applications and came up with four classifications to which they could belong.

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FPgM report: 2019-28

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I am on PTO the week of 15 July, so there will be no FPgM report or FPgM office hours next week.

I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Announcements

Upcoming meetings

Fedora 31

Schedule

  • 2019-07-23 — Self-contained changes due
  • 2019-07-24–08-13 — Mass rebuild
  • 2019-08-13 — Code complete (testable) deadline
  • 2019-08-13 — Fedora 31 branch point

Changes

Announced

Submitted to FESCo

Approved by FESCo

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