Flock 2017’s CFP is open!

We need your Flock session proposals!

This year’s Flock is more action-oriented compared to previous Flocks. The majority of session slots are hackfests and workshops; only one day (Tuesday the 29th) is devoted to traditional talks.

Calendar showing days of Flock - Tue Aug 29, Wed Aug 30, Thu Aug 31, Fri Sep 1

The registration system allows you to submit 4 different types of proposals:

  • Talk (30 min) – A traditional talk, 30-minute time slot.
  • Talk (60 min) – A traditional talk, 60-minute time slot.
  • Do-Session (120 min) – A 2-hour long hackfest or workshop.
  • Do-Session (180 min) – A 3-hour long hackfest or workshop.

There is no session proposal limit. Feel free to submit as many proposals as you have ideas for.

Our CFP ends June 15 so you have one week to get those awesome proposals in!

Submit your Flock session proposal now!

How to create a strong proposal

How can you ensure your proposal is sufficiently strong enough for acceptance into Flock? Here are some tips and guidelines:

Align your proposal to Fedora’s new mission statement.

Fedora’s mission statement was updated almost two months ago. The revised and final mission statement is:

Fedora creates an innovative platform for hardware, clouds, and containers that enables software developers and community members to build tailored solutions for their users.

If you can explain the connection between your session and this goal, you’ll make the proposal stronger. Even if you are not directly working on a hardware, cloud, or container effort, you can relate your session to the goal.

For example, say you’d like to propose a Fedora badges hackfest. Task the badges hackfest specifically with creating badges for activities associated with efforts aligned specifically with hardware, cloud, and container to strengthen it.

Make sure the folks relevant to your topic are involved.

If you want to propose a Fedora badges workshop, that’s totally cool. You might want talk to Marie Nordin or Masha Leonova, and see what their plans are, give them a heads up, and coordinate or even propose it together with one or both of them.

The committee reviewing proposals occasionally sees duplicate / overlapping topics proposed. Generally, the committee chooses the proposal that has the subject matter experts most involved in the topic. A weak proposal on a topic has no indication of involvement or coordination with subject matter experts most actively involved in a topic.

Make the audience for your topic clear.

Think about who you are giving your talk to or who you want to show up to your workshop or hackfest. If you’re proposing a Fedora Hubs hackfest, are there enough Pythonistas in Fedora to help? (Yes, yes, there are. 🙂 )

Tailor your content for your audience – while you may be able to get folks familiar with Python, they may not be familiar with Flask or how Fedora Hubs widgets work, so make sure your proposal notes this material will be covered.

General user talks are discouraged. This Flock will be focused on empowering Fedora contributors and actively getting stuff done, so make sure your audience is a subset of existing Fedora contributors.

Focus on taking or inspiring action.

A major focus of this year’s Flock is taking action, so talks that inspire action and hackfests / workshops where action will take place are going to be strong proposals.


Feel free to ask on the flock-planning list if you have any questions. Or, if you have private concerns / questions, you can email flock-staff@fedoraproject.org.

The Flock planning committee is looking forward to seeing your proposals! 🙂

Submit your Flock session proposal now!