Tag: Fedora Summer Coding (page 1 of 3)

Implementation of varlink support for libnmstate – GSoC’20 nmstate project

This blog is about the varlink implementation in nmstate and my experience in this during this period. As a computer science enthusiast I’m interested in researching new topics. This project is my first experience in open source development has been a challenging experience. The project aims to enable libnmstate to be used by other programming languages, systems which don’t support python and via remote connections. I have also included some links which I referred to. I hope it will be helpful for students like me.

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How Fedora and Outreachy Helped Me Hone My Flexibility With Timelines

Update: I’m in the seventh week of my Outreachy internship with Fedora! I am working to create a GraphQL API for Bodhi. The following image shows a Gantt chart of the ideal timeline that my mentors and I came up with to get the project up and running:

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GSoC 2020 nmstate project update for June

This blog is about my experience working in nmstate project and first month in GSoC coding period. I was able to start working on implementing the varlink support mid of community bonding period. This was very helpful because I was able to identify some issues in the python varlink package that was not mentioned in documentation and I had to spend more time finding the cause of the issue. There have been minor changes to proposed code structure and project timeline after the feedback from the community members. In the beginning it was difficult to identify syntax errors in varlink interface definitions. This has been slow progress because of new issues and following are the tasks I have completed so far.

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Outreachy with Fedora’s Bodhi Project

Here, I express my hitherto educative, fun, and exciting experience as an Outreachy intern.

About the Project

The aim of the project is to provide a /graphql endpoint to Bodhi, Fedora’s update gating system. This would allow users to query through Bodhi’s resources using GraphQL.

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Welcome GSoC 2020 Interns

Fedora has been participating in Google Summer Of Code for a long time and we have had good experience with this. Our process is to call for mentors on mailing lists and community blogs after we apply for the the program. But this doesn’t mean you have to wait for the call for mentors, you can anytime propose a project and we work with you to polish it and try to find the best place for it (be it outreacy or GSoC). We gather project ideas on Mentored Project issues.
Thank you everyone for submitting a project idea in the past and we are looking forward to have more of participation from you all.

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GSoC summer 2019: Fedora Gooey Karma

This blog post is to summarise my journey for Google Summer of Code (GSoC) with the Fedora community, The journey started the day I mailed my mentor about the project, and it was a hell of a ride for sure. Let’s get started.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Django, Docker, and fedora-messaging

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Pytest, UI enhancements, FAS search

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

Continue reading

A Closer Look at Fedora Projects

What is the Fedora Project?

The Fedora Project is a community of people working together to build free and open source software platform and to collaborate on and share user-focused solutions built on that platform. It makes an operating system and make it easy for people to do useful stuff with it.

Actually, they produce several operating systems, or editions. The one that new contributors are most likely to be interested in, and focused on, is Fedora Workstation. Fedora Workstation has a wide range of software that’s suitable for almost anyone. All of the software provided with Fedora is open source and free to download and use.

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Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

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