Tag: OpenShift

Outreachy FHP week 7: Django, Docker, and fedora-messaging

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

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News from Fedora Infrastructure

Most of the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team met in person last month in Brno during a week. CPE team is the team at Red Hat that works on Fedora and CentOS infrastructure. As a distributed team, we usually use DevConf.cz as an opportunity to meet face to face.

This is an update on what we have been up to during this week.

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Open Power Summit 2018 event report

With some rather unfortunate delays is my report from last year’s Open Power Summit. Let’s dive in it, without further delay.

It took place between 3th and 4th October 2018 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. It is event organized by the Open Power Foundation, steward of the Open Power CPU ISA. It is open and builds on top of the heritage of the past Power architectures, enabling any vendor or individual to dive in to the technical deeps of it or even implement it on their own.

 At the venue there have been booths of different foundation members and affiliated organizations. Like Raptor engineering with their Talos II and Blackbird platforms on showcase, Mellanox with accelerators cards, Yadro with big-data memory(RAM) dense servers or OpenCAPI consortium with bunch of accelerators from various manufacturers that are leveraging the OpenCAPI standard, just to note few. To add on the OpenCAPI it is open offspring of the CAPI that has been introduced by IBM with their Power8 architecture.

OpenCAPI booth
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Fedora Cloud FAD 2016 Report

The Fedora Cloud Working Group met on June 7 and 8 in Raleigh to work on deliverables for Fedora 25 and beyond. As it turns out, we had a really productive set of discussions and have some good ideas for the Cloud Working Group going forward.

Some of the discussions were around immediate action items, some were around ideas of where we’d like to go – and these will require additional discussion with the larger community. As a reminder, the working group tries to operate on a consensus model and with transparency as much as possible. This means major decisions are usually only taken after a discussion has been held on the cloud@lists.fedoraproject.org mailing list and have either gotten enough +1’s from members to pass, pass via lazy consensus, or get knocked down for one reason or another.

Here’s a quick sweep of major topics that came up over the two days!

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