Author: Brian Proffitt

Remembering a friend: Matthew Williams

Matthew Williams (left) interviews Ryan Jarvinen (right)

Matthew Williams (left) interviews Ryan Jarvinen (right)

One of the things about working in open source software communities is that you are always moving forward. It’s hard not to get a sense of momentum and progress when it seems you are constantly striving to improve and build on the work you and others have done before.

But sometimes you have to pause to reflect, because sometimes there is loss.

Remembering Matthew Williams

It is with heavy hearts that the Fedora Project community learned yesterday of the passing of one of its prominent members, Matthew Williams, who lost his three-year battle with cancer Wednesday morning. Matthew, also known as “Lord Drachenblut,” was an Indiana native and a passionate member of the Fedora community.

Matthew’s passion to constantly improve the software and hardware with which he worked created a tireless advocate for the Fedora Project, and his presence was felt at conferences across the nation: SCaLE, Ohio LinuxFest, and the former Indiana LinuxFest, an Indianapolis-based event that he helped found.

Matthew also devoted time to interviewing and archiving notable figures in the free and open source software communities to learn what drove people to work on their projects. He was also very driven to share what he knew, launching the Open FOSS training site in 2015 to help new Linux users with getting involved with any Linux distribution. While he was active in the Fedora community, Matthew was also very involved with Ubuntu as well.

A great deal of what Matthew did for Fedora centered on getting more people involved and knowledgeable about the project. To that end, he was the owner of the Fedora G+ page, a responsibility he took very seriously. Under his management, the page has over 25,000 members and is one of the Fedora Project’s strongest outreach channels.

All of this work and achievement does not really portray what Matthew was like as a person: a kind and thoughtful soul with an unwavering dedication to the things in which he believed. For those who worked with and knew Lord Drachenblut, it is your personal thoughts we invite you to reflect upon today. For the rest, know that the Fedora Project and the open source software community at large is a little more poorer today with the passing of our colleague.

The building will continue, but we will miss our friend Matthew.

Fedora’s Love For Python Continues

In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.

With that in mind, the Fedora Marketing team, in conjunction with members of the Fedora Python SIG, has put together a new Fedora Loves Python brochure, just in time for PyCon 2016.

2016 Python Brochure

What’s new in Python brochure

This is not the first time the Marketing team has put together something like this; the team designed and released a more retro-looking edition for Pycon 2013. The new edition of the brochure is consistent with the Fedora Project’s branding and design, and has been updated with some cool new facts, including:

  • DNF, the software installation and dependency tool within Fedora, is built with Python and supports Python 2 and 3.
  • Inkscape, GIMP, and Blender include Python support, so you can script all sorts of graphics plugins in Python.
  • Fedmsg, Bodhi, Koji, and the Fedora Account System are some of many Python-built apps within Fedora’s infrastructure.

Fedora’s relationship with Python is very close, and has been since 2003. The ease in which developers can work with Python tools like PyPy, PyDev, Winpdb, and GitPython (to name a few) makes Fedora a very useful platform for coders–and we are very happy to be able to show some of that off.

Be sure to look for Fedora at PyCon in Portland, Oregon next month, or visit the Python resources in this article, to learn more about using Fedora as your Python platform of choice!

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