Tag: events (page 1 of 10)

Play Minecraft with Fedora Friends at Nest 2020

Thanks to our friends at the Spigot MC project, the Fedora Community is invited to build, survive, and thrive in an open-source Minecraft server until Monday, 10 August 2020! Join your friends and invite your family to join by connecting to fedora.spigotmc.net in the Minecraft: Java Edition client.

Screenshot of the spawnpoint on the Fedora Minecraft/Spigot server.
Screenshot of the spawnpoint on the Fedora Minecraft/Spigot server.
Design credit: Code_Seven

How to connect

A paid Minecraft: Java Edition account is required to log in. Open the Minecraft game client and add a new third-party multiplayer server:

fedora.spigotmc.net

The server can hold up to 100 players at once.

What to do

Play Minecraft together with other Fedorans from around the world! Whether you want to build your own house or battle skeletons, zombies, and creepers in the night, you can craft your own adventure.

The Minecraft/Spigot server is a great way to catch some down time between sessions, and socialize with other gamers in the Fedora Community. You can also invite your family, friends, or young Fedorans to join in too.

The Minecraft/Spigot server will remain online until Monday, 10 August. After then, a download of the server world (not including The Nether and The End) will be made available so you can load the Fedora Nest Minecraft world in single player or other multiplayer servers.

Code of Conduct

The Fedora Minecraft/Spigot server follows the same Code of Conduct as Fedora Nest and the wider Fedora Community. Be kind, be respectful, and have fun!

Remember to keep the chat and your creations family-friendly.

Get help

Need an admin? If you need to get help in the Minecraft/Spigot server, reach out to Justin W. Flory on Telegram (@jwflory), Freenode IRC (jwf), or email (FAS: jflory7). Additionally, you can also email the Flock Staff Team for support (flock-staff [at] fedoraproject [dot] org).

Special thanks to Michael Dardis and the SpigotMC Team for sponsoring the Minecraft game server for Fedora Nest 2020.


Cover photo by Patrick Tomasso on Unsplash.

Council policy proposal: withdrawing support from events

The Fedora Council is considering a change in policy that better defines how the Council will handle withdrawing from sponsored events. The policy as proposed by Ben Cotton, with edits from the Mindshare Committee is:

The Fedora Council may choose to withdraw Fedora’s support from events or other activities that involve fiscal sponsorship or use of Fedora trademarks when it determines that participation is not in the interests of the Fedora Project. Decisions to withdraw support will be published in venues normally used for Council decisions. Deliberation and reasoning for the decision should be public to the extent possible. The Council will engage with the committee/group/team that is involved with the event in question to ensure their input is considered.

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Fedora Council video meeting: Aoife Moloney talks about Red Hat’s CPE team, and we discuss COVID-19 plans

Every month, the Fedora Council holds a recorded video meeting where, in addition to normal business, we have a discussion with someone from the community about the area they work on. This month, we’re joined by Aiofe Moloney from Red Hat’s Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team. She walks us through that team’s workflow and plan for interaction with the community, while Matthew reveals secrets of Red Hat’s internal business organization. We also talk briefly about Fedora’s response to COVID-19 and our upcoming event sponsorships and attendance.

If you have suggestions for a future video meeting guest, please add them to the wish list.

Fedora 31 Release Party – Karachi

What is Fedora 31 Release Party

Fedora 31 Release Party was a social event for people to meet & connect who are curious about Fedora from Karachi in general, and check out the cool & awesome features of the new Fedora 31 release. It also served as an opportunity for people to find out what Fedora and free software in general is all about and ask questions of people already involved in the community.

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Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: more miscellaneous stuff

This is part three of a four-part series recapping the Fedora Council’s face-to-face meeting in November 2019.

In addition to the big topic of the Fedora Project Vision, we used the opportunity to cover some other Fedora Council business. Because it’s a lot, we’re breaking the reporting on this into two posts, kind of arbitrarily — here’s the second of those.

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Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City

On May 23, 2019, the Fedora Community in Mexico City ran an awesome Fedora 30 Release Party. This activity took place in the local Red Hat office. We really appreciate the space for our activities and particularly thanks to Alex Callejas (darkaxl017) for doing all the necessary paperwork.

We had three main activities: An amazing talk from Rolando Cedillo (@rolman) about KVM in Fedora, a Q&A session and our networking time with pizza and Fedora cup cakes.

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Flock Talk & Session Proposal Reminder

It’s hard for me to believe, but it’s been more than five years since we launched the “Fedora.next” initiative. At the end of Fedora’s first decade, we knew it would be important to think, plan, and adjust so the project could continue successfully in the decades to come. Now we’re halfway into the next one, and this Flock conference will be an important time for reflecting on our progress and charting our path for the next five years and beyond.

Because Flock is focused specifically at our contributors and developers, this is a unique conference and we’re looking for talks and sessions that reflect that.

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Fedora Mexico: Three months of activities

The Fedora contributors and enthusiast in Mexico city has monthly meetings since February. Here a little resume of our activities as a local community:

First meeting

The “Fedora Containers Lab” workshop by Alex Callejas (darkaxl017) was the first event of our monthly meetings, the topics were:

  • Installation of KVM and libraries
  • Setup a Fedora Server virtual machine.
  • Install podman and set up many containers inside the virtual machine
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Fedora 30: Let’s have an awesome release party!

Fedora 30  is about to be out.It’s time to plan their activities around the release.

The most common activity to do is organize release parties. A release party is also a great way for other contributors in the community to get involved with advocacy in their local regions. Learn how to organize a release party and get a badge for it in this article.

Organizing a release party

How do you organize a release party? There is a page that has the full details. You will find hints of what you can start doing now and how to do it. Anyone with a valid FAS account can host a Release Party!!

Hosting Release Party

When you’re ready, you need to do a few simple things:

1. Send an email to the mindshare mailing list and let the world know what you’re planning. Ambassadors and others may have suggestions or advice that can improve your event. This also lets you find others who may want to help you with your event.
2. Open a ticket in the Mindshare Issue Tracker and let people know about your event.If your event needs financial or swag support (see below) this is a crucial (and mandatory) step. Please use the Release Party template.
3. Once your party is approved, do the following: calendar, so others can easily find it.
4. Request a QR code to award the Release Party Attendee badge. You can do it by opening an issue at mindshare pagure .
5.  Put in a swag request ticket in the Fedora Budget Repo.
6.  Finalize your plans and hold your party.
7.  After your party, write an event report. An event report lets the community know what happened and how it went. Ideally your report will be shared on the Fedora Community Blog, but posting it on your own blog and the Fedora Planet is fine too. If your event requires financial or swag support, this is mandatory. These reports should help us understand what happened and how the party went. Ideas for what went well and what could be improved are welcome.
8. If you have financial assistance approved, file a reimbursement ticket in the Fedora Budget Repository

Have fun and earn a badge

Just make sure you write a report of it (only people with reports get a badge awarded) and have some nice pictures with happy faces. Then you will surely earn the badge for release party organizers.

Fedora Kernel and i18n Test Day: PICT College

Planning

We met for 2 meeting instances to plan this college meetup, once on 30th August 2018 and then again on 3rd September 2018 in Red Hat office. This event was planned as an alternative to the September Fedora Pune Meetup. We decided to do something different this time by executing a recent Fedora 29 test day with a room full of students of Computer department in the PICT college of Pune. Professor Mayur was our point of contact in the college and we had shared the Fedora 29 image under test with him. He ensured students have it installed on their respective systems before the actual test day. Pravin Satpute from Red hat helped us with coordination with the college. Kaushik Banerjee arranged for few Fedora and Red Hat badges to distribute among the attending students. The event took place on Friday, 7th September 2018.

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