Tag: Development (page 1 of 3)

Fedora was at PyCon SK 2017

At the second weekend in March 2017, Fedora had a booth at PyCon SK, a community-organized conference for the Python programming language held in Bratislava, Slovakia. The event happened for the second time this year, and it happened with Fedora again.

PyCon SK 2017 took 3 days. First day most of the talks were in Slovak (or Czech) and Michal Cyprian presented problems that my arise when users use sudo pip and how we want to solve those problems in Fedora by making sudo pip safe again. During the lightnings talks section, I presented about Elsa, a tool that helps to create static web pages using Flask. Elsa powers up the Fedora Loves Python website.

Michal Cyprian presenting

Michal Cyprian presenting. Photo by Ondrej Dráb, CC BY-SA

The next day was mostly English. Another Fedora contributors Jona Azizaj and Petr Viktorin had their talks. Jona presented about building Python communities and empowering women. Petr’s talk was about the balance of Python (constraints and conventions versus the freedom to do whatever you want) and its impact on the language and the community. Petr also metacoached the Django Girls workshop on Sunday.

But Fedora’s presence was not just through people. Fedora had a booth filled with swag. We gave out all our remaining Fedora Loves Python stickers, plenty of Fedora 25 DVDs, pins, stickers, pens, buttons… We had couple of Proud Fedora User t-shirts available and plenty of Fedora users asked for them, so we decided to come up with a quiz about Fedora and a raffle to decide who gets them.

Fedora Swag

Fedora Swag

Fedora booth at PyCon SK 2017

Fedora booth at PyCon SK 2017. Photo by Ondrej Dráb, CC BY-SA

Lot of the visitors were already familiar with Fedora or even Fedora users this year, which was quite different in compassion with the previous year, where a lot of people were actually asking what Fedora is. <joke>Maybe because we already explained it a year ago, now every visitor already uses Fedora?</joke>

See you next year Bratislava!

Featured Image Photo by Ondrej Dráb, CC BY-SA

IRC classroom instructors wanted

We’ve been working to restart the classroom sessions that we hosted regularly until a few years ago. We had a few discussions at the Fedora Join SIG meeting recently and realized that there’s so much that can be done. Among the ideas were using video communication platforms, setting up a moodle instance, and linking up with the campus programmes. Setting up a complete classroom programme requires a lot more homework before we can come up with a system and put the infrastructure in place. So, while this is being worked on, we thought it may be a good idea to resurrect the classic IRC classroom sessions to get the ball rolling in the meantime.

Instructors needed for classroom sessions

Before we can announce the classroom sessions, we want to line a few up. This is where we need help – we’re looking for instructors that want to take up these sessions. The sessions can be about anything – tools (Vim, Git, Emacs, Inkscape, Gimp, etc.), workflows (using updates-testing to help QA, contributing to the Magazine or Community Blog, etc.), development (Flask, kernel hacking, debugging, etc.)  or even educational sessions such as the free software philosophy. Really, anything at all.

If you’d like to take up an IRC classroom session, please get in touch with us on the classroom mailing list.  We’re also looking for recruitersemcees and anything else you want to help with!

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017: Mentors and ideas needed!

The Fedora Project has participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) as a mentoring organization for over a decade now. GSoC is a summer program aiming to bring more student developers into open source software development. It enables students to spend their summer break working with open source organizations on projects proposed by particpation organizations and supported by mentors. Once again, Fedora is participating again this year and is looking for project ideas.

Continue reading

Base Runtime and the Generational Core

A Quick Primer on Modularity

lego_chicago_city_view_2001Modularity (formerly, Modularization) is an ongoing initiative in Fedora to resolve the issue of divergent, occasionally conflicting lifecycles of different components. A module provides functionality (such as a web server) and includes well-integrated and well-tested components (such as Apache httpd and the libraries on which it depends). It can be deployed into production in various ways: as “classic” RPM packages or a container image, and is updated as a whole. Different modules can emphasize new features, stability, security, etc. differently.

Modules differ from traditional packaging in certain important ways. Perhaps most importantly, they allow us to separate internal implementation details from the exposed interfaces of the module. Historically in Fedora, if a packager wanted to deliver a new web application, that would also often mean that they needed to package and carry the framework or other libraries used by that application. This tended to be a double-edged sword: on the one hand, those libraries were now available for anyone to pick up and use in Fedora. However, in many cases, this meant that the primary maintainer of that package might actually have no specific knowledge or understanding of it except that its lack would mean their application didn’t work. This can be a problem if a person is carrying around a library for the use of a single helper function and don’t want to be responsible for issues in the rest of the library.

Continue reading

What does Factory 2.0 mean for Modularity?

This blog now has a drop-down category called Modularity. But, many arteries of Modularity lead into a project called Factory 2.0. These two are, in fact, pretty much inseparable. In this post, we’ll talk about the 5 problems that need to be solved before Modularity can really live.

Continue reading

AppData content ratings for games shipped in Fedora

GNOME Software developer Richard Hughes recently e-mailed the Fedora developers mailing requesting Fedora package maintainers to update their AppData files to include age ratings using OARS.

“The latest feature we want to support upstream is age classifications
for games. I’ve asked all the maintainers listed in the various
upstream AppData files (using the update contact email address) to
generate some OARS metadata and add it to the .appdata.xml file, but
of course some AppData files do not have any contact details and so
they got missed. I’m including this email here as I know some AppData
files are included in the various downstream spec files by Fedora
packagers. Generating metadata is really as simple as visiting
https://odrs.gnome.org/oars then answering about 20 questions with
multiple choice answers, then pasting the output inside the
<component> tag.

Using the <content_rating> tag means we can show games with an
appropriate age rating depending on the country of the end user. If
you have any comments about the questions on the OARS page please do
let me know. Before the pitchforks start being sharpened it’s an
anti-goal of the whole system to in any way filter the output of
search results dependent on age. The provided metadata is only used in
an informational way.”

If your package ships an AppData file, please consider updating it. If you have any queries about the addition or OARS, please discuss it on the Fedora developers mailing list.

Fedora Hubs: Getting started

Fedora Hubs: Getting started

Image courtesy of The Awkward Yeti

Fedora Hubs provides a consistent contributor experience across all Fedora teams and will serve as an “intranet” page for the Fedora Project. There are many different projects in Fedora with different processes and workflows. Hubs will serve as a single place for contributors to learn about and contribute to them in a standardized format. Hubs will also be a social network for Fedora contributors. It is designed as one place to go to keep up with everything and everybody across the project in ways that aren’t currently possible.

  • Want to hack on Hubs? The latest source code is on the open source git-based forge Pagure.
  • Want to learn more about the history behind Hubs? Máirín wrote a few blog posts on the progress of hubs.

This article will help you set up a Fedora Hubs development environment on your local machine.

Continue reading

FOSS Wave: FOSS and Fedora in Bangalore, India

FOSS and Fedora in Bangalore, India: Special Fedora pin

Shivam, who was leading the Fedora Badges leaderboard with Fedora QA contributions, shows off his pin

On August 20th, 2016, I helped organize the first workshop in my college, Christ University, titled “FOSS and Fedora“. The event was a great success!

Reviving Labyrinth

I have planned to do this for more than two months, but we didn’t have any computer science club in my college. If it was for one event, we could have done it separate, but I wanted to organize multiple workshops (open source, mobile app development, website development, competitions, robotics etc). Thus, we needed a proper platform to easily organize the events without bothering too many people.

Continue reading

Modularity Infrastructure Design

Co-authored by Courtney Pacheco and Ralph Bean

Note: This article is a follow-up to Introduction to Modularity.


Introduction

The purpose of our Modularity initiative is to support the building, maintaining, and shipping of modular things. So, in order to ensure these three requirements are met, we need to design a framework for building and composing the distribution.

In terms of the framework, in general, we are concerned about the possibility of creating an exponential number of component combinations with independent lifecycles. That is, when the number of component combinations becomes too large, we will not be able to manage them. So that we don’t accidentally make our lives worse, we must limit the number of supported modules with a policy and provide infrastructure automation to reduce the amount of manual work required.
Continue reading

FOSS Wave: Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

FOSS virtual meetup, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

A start of a big journey!

Furthering the efforts of some work around building a strong, tight-knit FOSS community around Fedora, I approached a few people from Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. I figured out the scope to talk about Fedora and Fedora quality assurance (QA). The target audience was bringing more college students from Bhopal into open source and Fedora.

Talking FOSS and Fedora with Bhopal

The meeting was short and simple. The audience was well-versed with free and open source software (FOSS) and many of them are presently contributing to various FOSS projects. We started off talking about how contributing to FOSS makes contributors industry-ready. As the cog wheel of time revolved, we shifted to “how people can join” the Fedora Project and start contributing!

Continue reading

Olderposts

Copyright © 2017 Fedora Community Blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑