Tag: Outreachy (page 1 of 2)

Outreachy FHP week 7: Django, Docker, and fedora-messaging

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Pytest, UI enhancements, FAS search

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

Continue reading

A Closer Look at Fedora Projects

What is the Fedora Project?

The Fedora Project is a community of people working together to build free and open source software platform and to collaborate on and share user-focused solutions built on that platform. It makes an operating system and make it easy for people to do useful stuff with it.

Actually, they produce several operating systems, or editions. The one that new contributors are most likely to be interested in, and focused on, is Fedora Workstation. Fedora Workstation has a wide range of software that’s suitable for almost anyone. All of the software provided with Fedora is open source and free to download and use.

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Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

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Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

This blog post summaries what I’ve completed in Phase 1 in my Outreachy internship with Fedora Happiness Packets, things I learned and the challenges I faced πŸ™‚

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What, Why and How: Outreachy 101

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.

I recently got selected for Outreachy with Fedora and thought I should document the entire process for other curious souls looking to participate! πŸ™‚

Note: This article by no means provides a β€˜hack’ or definite steps to get into Outreachy. These are just my thoughts on what worked for me.

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FHP: Outreachy! Is it that hard to crack?

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


Getting into one of the reputed internship programs might seem scary and unachievable especially when you don’t consider yourself an expert in that field, but trust me it’s not that hard to get into. How can I say this with so much certainty? Well, I got into Outreachy, one of the prestigious internships as a Fedora intern and through this article, I want to share my journey with you all.

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Integrating Fedora Messaging in Fedora Happiness Packets

The Federated Message Bus, or Fedmsg, is used within the Fedora Infrastructure to easily connect services using ZeroMQ publishers and subscribers. This library is now deprecated in favour of Fedora Messaging.

Fedora Messaging provides a framework for declaring message schemas and a set of APIs to publish and consume messages to and from AMQP brokers.

In the project Fedora Happiness Packets, Fedmsg was set up to send messages to the Bus so that Fedora Badges could be awarded to the sender when they send a Happiness Packet, i.e an email worth of appreciation! My piece in this jigsaw was to migrate from Fedmsg to Fedora Messaging in this containerized project.

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My Outreachy 2019 experience with Fedora Happiness Packets: Contribution phase

Firstly, what’s Outreachy?

Outreachy is a program that provides internships to work in Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). Outreachy internships are open to applicants around the world. Interns work remotely, and are not required to move. Interns are paid a stipend of $5,500 USD for the three month internship. Interns have a $500 USD travel stipend to attend conferences or events.

How did I get into it?

I was looking for a remote job (more on this in another blog) and have been applying to many positions that I thought I would fit in. If you have applied to jobs, you would know that this process is not very forgiving. Most of the applications had no response, and some others already had the positions filled (I don’t know why was the job listing not taken down πŸ˜•).

During this process I was actively learning new things, mostly JS based since my basic stack is HTML-CSS-JS. So I was learning NodeJs, MongoDB, React to build up my skill-set and get better at what I want to do.

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Outreachy 2019 with Fedora Happiness Packets: application period

Outreachy provides remote internship under Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) Communities to the under represented groups in technology. It runs twice an year, mid-year and end of year. I decided to participate in its summer run.

Why Outreachy?

Before I get into anything, as a rule of thumb, I ask myself why? Why is it that I wanted to participate in Outreachy?

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