Tag: Fedora Badges (page 1 of 3)

My Outreachy Internship: The journey so far…

Progress

For the past several weeks I’ve been working on migrating Fedora Badges to Badgr. I have completed the following tasks so far:

  • Wrote an SDK for communicating with badgr-server
  • Tests for the SDK
  • Scripts to add, issue, revoke badges
  • Openshift templates for deployment

I’m currently working on adding FAS authentication to badgr-server as well as trying to work out my approach to the fedora-messaging middleware that will issue badges. I’ve learned a lot while working on these tasks including testing (which I did for the first time), OpenShift, and several nuances related to python.

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The future of Fedora Community apps

The Community Platform Engineering team (formerly Community Infrastructure) indicated in July of 2019 that they have a higher workload than the team can bear. To ease this, they evaluated the applications that fit their mission statement. The applications that didn’t fit the mission were proposed for hand off to the community. 

I am happy to say there is a lot being done to preserve the applications that our community values. I have been working with the Fedora Project Leader (FPL), Fedora Program Manager (FPgM), Community Platform Engineering team (CPE), and the Open Source Program Office (OSPO) at Red Hat to transition app hosting and maintenance from CPE to OSPO.

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Friday with Infra

What is Friday with Infra?

Friday with Infra is a new event done by CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team, that will help potential contributors to start working on some of the applications we maintain. During this event members of the CPE team will help you to start working on those applications and help you with any issue you may encounter. At the end of this event you should be able to maintain the application by yourself.

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Outreachy FHP week 7: Django, Docker, and fedora-messaging

This is part of a recurring series between May – August 2019 on the Community Blog about Fedora Happiness Packets. These posts are published as part of a series of prompts from the Outreachy program.


From Outreachy.org: The theme for this week is “Modifying Expectations”. Outreachy mentors and interns start the internship with a specific set of project goals. However, usually those goals need to be modified, and that’s perfectly fine! Delays to projects happen. Maybe your project turned out to be more complicated than you or your mentor anticipated. Maybe you needed to learn some concepts before you could tackle project tasks. Maybe the community documention wasn’t up-to-date or was wrong. These are all perfectly valid reasons for projects to be a bit behind schedule, as long as you’ve been working full-time on the project. In fact, free and open source contributors have to deal with these kinds of issues all the time. Projects often seem simple until you start working on them. Project timelines are ususally a very optimistic view of what could happen if everything goes exactly as planned. It often doesn’t, but people still make optimistic plans. Modifying your project timeline to set more realistic goals is a skill all contributors need to learn.

Your goal for this week’s blog post is to write a report about your progress on your project. Talk about what you accomplished so far. Talk about what goals too more time than expected. The blog post should also detail what your modified goals for the second half of the internship is.

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Application service categories and community handoff

The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team recently wrote about our face-to-face meeting where we developed a team mission statement and developed a framework for making our workload more manageable. Having more focus will allow us to progress higher priority work for multiple stakeholders and move the needle on more initiatives in a more efficient manner than how we are working right now. 

During the F2F we walked through the process of how to gracefully remove ourselves from applications that are not fitting our mission statement. The next couple of months will be a transition phase as we want to ensure continuity and cause minimum disruption to the community. To assist in that strategy, we analysed our applications and came up with four classifications to which they could belong.

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Design new Fedora Badges with the style guide

This week, the Fedora Badges team published a full walk-through of how to design new Fedora Badges on the Fedora Docs site. The walk-through is the best reference to use when designing new badges. It includes the following:

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Top Badgers of 2017: Carl George

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Carl George (carlwgeorge), who clocked in at the #1 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 37 badges! As of the writing of this article, Carl is the #267 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Top Badgers of 2017: Fabio Valentini

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Fabio Valentini (decathorpe), who clocked in at the #3 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 34 badges! As of the writing of this article, Fabio is the #222 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Top Badgers of 2017: Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez (bt0dotninja), who clocked in at the #4 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 33 badges! As of the writing of this article, Alberto is the #117 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Top Badgers of 2017: Alessio Ciregia

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Alessio Ciregia (alciregi), who clocked in at the #5 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 32 badges! As of the writing of this article, Alessio is the #513 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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