Tag: Fedora Badges (page 1 of 2)

Top Badgers of 2017: Carl George

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Carl George (carlwgeorge), who clocked in at the #1 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 37 badges! As of the writing of this article, Carl is the #267 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Top Badgers of 2017: Fabio Valentini

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Fabio Valentini (decathorpe), who clocked in at the #3 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 34 badges! As of the writing of this article, Fabio is the #222 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Top Badgers of 2017: Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez (bt0dotninja), who clocked in at the #4 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 33 badges! As of the writing of this article, Alberto is the #117 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Top Badgers of 2017: Alessio Ciregia

What is “Top Badgers”?

“Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

This article features Alessio Ciregia (alciregi), who clocked in at the #5 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 32 badges! As of the writing of this article, Alessio is the #513 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

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Earn Fedora Badges designing Badges!

Fedora Badges is a perfect place to start if you want to help out the Fedora Design Team. “I’m not a designer!” “I can’t draw!” “I’ve never opened Inkscape” – you might say. And that is totally fine! Everybody can help out, and none of those reasons will stop you from designing your first badge (and getting badges for designing badges).

Finding a Badges ticket

There are quite a few badges tickets. One might have difficulty looking for one that’s open, one that’s possible to implement, or one with a concept. So we decided to put together a list of relatively easy badges designs that are up for grabs. This post will go out about once a month and provide you with such list of badge tickets carefully selected by us!

First of all let’s look at the process of creating a badge. If you can, attend a badges workshop. If none are available, no problem! Here’s a step-by-step guide with tips. You can also ask questions on IRC (#fedora-design) or at our bi-weekly meeting every other Wednesday at 7-8 AM EST on #fedora-meeting-1 on freenode.

These badges are still up for grabs! Try designing one of the following badges and we will help you through the process:

  • #432: “I’ve been there“, for visiting a Fedora booth at any event
    For this badge design, reuse this artwork (https://badges.fedoraproject.org/badge/the-panda-is-in) and add a panda in front! (https://badges.fedoraproject.org/badge/lets-have-a-party-fedora-25)
  • #333: “Oh, wait!“, for canceling a Koji build
    This artwork just needs a little tweaking, and it will be ready! Download the svg and make the suggested changes in the comments.
  • #150: “Testing Day participant“, for contributing to a Fedora QA test day
    This badge needs original artwork, but it will be a breeze! Create a drawing of a piece of paper, and put the letters A+, B, C, D etc in separate files to create an entire series.

Earn Fedora Badges designing Badges!

Fedora Badges is a perfect place to start if you want to help out the Fedora Design Team. “I’m not a designer!” “I can’t draw!” “I’ve never opened Inkscape” – you might say. And that is totally fine! Everybody can help out, and none of those reasons will stop you from designing your first badge (and getting badges for designing badges)!

Finding a Badges ticket

There are quite a few badges tickets! One might have difficulty looking for one that’s open, one that’s possible to implement, or one with a concept. So we decided to put together a list of relatively easy badges designs that are up for grabs. This post will go out about once a month and provide you with such list of badge tickets carefully selected by us!

First of all let’s look at the process of creating a badge. If you can, attend a badges workshop. If none are available, no problem! Here’s a step-by-step guide with tips. You can also ask questions on IRC (#fedora-design) or at our bi-weekly meeting every other Wednesday at 7-8 AM EST on #fedora-meeting-1 on freenode.

Once you have all the resources, read through the guide, and are ready to create, pick one of these and set yourself to owner:

  • #432: “I’ve been there“, for visiting a Fedora booth at any event
  • #333: “Oh, wait!“, for canceling a Koji build
  • #150: “Testing Day participant“, for contributing to a Fedora QA test day

Fedora 25: Let’s have an awesome release party!

Fedora 25 is currently in Beta status. With another Fedora release not so far away, it’s time for the Ambassadors to plan their activities around the release. The most common activity for Ambassadors to do around a release is organize release parties. A release party is also a great way for other contributors in the community to get involved with advocacy in their local regions. Learn how to organize a release party and get a badge for it in this article.

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Internationalization test day report for Fedora 25

Like every Fedora release, in preparation for Fedora 25 release, the Globalization Team organized an Internationalization (i18n) Test Day on September 28. It was nice to see that people came from all over the world to participate in this test day event. Since the early morning, internationalization engineers were present in #fedora-test-day and #fedora-g11n channel to help people testing on this day.
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Test Day: Internationalization (i18n) features of Fedora 25

Internationalization Test Day

Test Day: Internationalization (i18n) features of Fedora 25

We do have a badge for participating!

We have new, interesting i18n features (changes) introduced in Fedora 25. Those are as follows:

  • Emoji typing – In the computing world, it’s rare to have person not know about emoji. Before, it was difficult to type  emoji in Fedora. Now, we have an emoji typing feature in Fedora 25.
  • Unicode 9.0 – With each release, Unicode introduces new characters and scripts to its encoding standard. We have a good number of additions in Unicode 9.0. Important libraries are updated to get the new additions into Fedora.
  • IBus typing booster Multilingual support – IBus typing booster started providing multilingual support (typing more than one language using single IME – no need to switch) from Fedora 24, but the UI setup was not ready. Fedora 25 has this ready.

Other than this, we also need to make sure all other languages works well specifically input, output, storage and printing.

How to participate

Most of the information is available on the Test Day wiki page. In case of doubts, feel free to send an email to the testing team mailing list.

Though it is a test day, we normally keep it on for the whole week. If you don’t have time tomorrow, feel free to complete it in the coming few days and upload your test results.

Let’s test and make sure this works well for our users!

Fedora needs you to port a Python package!

Fedora is always moving forward and that means switching to Python 3. There are plenty of upstream projects that already support Python 3. Unfortunately, they are often not packaged in Fedora. We try to keep track of such cases and more in the Fedora Python 3 Porting Database. There, you can see these packages marked with a blue color and listed on the page for Mispackaged packages. Get up to three Fedora badges for updating spec files to support Python 3! Join the porting party, help us move to the future and get your reward. We can port it, but not without your help!

Join the Python 3 Porting Party! Port a package to Python 3

Join the Python 3 Porting Party!

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