Category: G11n (page 2 of 2)

All articles in this category are related to the Globalization (localization and translation) team in the Fedora Project.

Fedora Globalization (G11n) Activity Day – November 2015

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Tokyo view from 40th floor of Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office

We already had a number of blog posts regarding how Globalization (G11n) Fedora Activity Days (FADs) went. After all of these reports, it makes sense to have one post discussing the achievements from our Activity Days.

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G11n team ends Fedora Activity Day on high note

Team picture of the Fedora G11n team

Team picture of the Fedora G11n team. Source: pravin-s.blogspot.com.au

On November 1st – 3rd, 2015, the Fedora Globalization (G11n) team held their Fedora Activity Day (FAD) in the Red Hat office in Tokyo, Japan. A Fedora Activity Day is a mini-conference where contributors get together to work on major tasks related to Fedora. The G11n team met with objectives of working on Fedora 24 development plans, brainstorming on a Fedora globalization workflow, and deciding strategy for different Fedora products.

Fedora contributor and member of the G11n team, Pravin Satpute, wrote detailed reports of the happenings over the course of the FAD. You can read his Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3 write-ups on his blog.

Globalization test days report for Fedora 23

What is globalization?

In software, globalization means two ways to make software useful globally: internationalization and localization. Because technical folks don’t enjoy typing long words, these are often abbreviated. Respectively we refer to them as G11n, I18n, and L10n. (The numbers refer to how many letters have been dropped!)

  • I18n is making software capable of supporting global users.
  • L10n is making translations for the text that appears in software.

So globalization ensures all users can use software, regardless of language. There’s a recent proposal in Fedora to unify our globalization work. This brings benefits for all users, by tying together I18n and L10n efforts for better results.

Test days for Fedora 23

Each Fedora release, developers add interesting features and changes. The Fedora QA group puts in extra effort to make sure these features work well. The Fedora QA group runs test days, together with our development teams. Test days usually happen between Alpha and Beta test releases. These events are essential to help us find critical flaws.

The Globalization team organized two test days for Fedora 23. There was a L10n test day on August 18, and an I18n test day on September 1.

The L10n test day tested translations in Fedora apps. The team checked whether apps are localized, and whether their text is available for translation. Here’s a summary:

The I18n test day checked input methods. Input methods allow users to enter data using their language. These are often combined with special fonts and rendering to make language readable. The team tested default and language specific input methods. They also checked script rendering and related tools like fonts-tweak-tool and dnf-langpacks. In summary:

Getting involved

Are you a non-English speaking Fedora user with globalization issues? Do you have an idea for improvement? If so, discuss with the team early in the development phase of Fedora. Once the Alpha and Beta releases happen, we’re already working on making features stable. You can see the important dates on the Fedora release schedule.

You can also get involved in Fedora development as a tester. As you can see, there’s a good level of friendly help in our globalization related test days. We’d love your help too, to move Fedora and upstream projects ahead for users in your region!

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